Andrea provided corrections master
authorGood Guy <good1.2guy@gmail.com>
Sat, 4 Dec 2021 18:10:21 +0000 (11:10 -0700)
committerGood Guy <good1.2guy@gmail.com>
Sat, 4 Dec 2021 18:10:21 +0000 (11:10 -0700)
parts/Installation.tex
parts/Quickstart.tex

index 8c7aa5486cd3dedd581bb4d18b418fdfe71dec32..5aafa09c816fdc7ecd420a9a66412f52e76d05a4 100644 (file)
@@ -11,9 +11,9 @@ and since each release is named differently, you can keep a number of versions i
 and when testing from a terminal you just have to type CinGG, then hit tab, and complete it to
 the desired date release.
 
-For 64-bit systems you can choose between an image with up-to-date libraries or one that supports older libraries, which you should use only if the first image gives you problems with unsupported libs. There is also a 32-bit older distro available that has \textit{i686} as part of the filename that currently works on older distros but may not work on the latest distros and
-definitely does now work on Debian version 11.00 (most of the popular Linux distributions such
-as Arch, Ubuntu, and Fedora have dropped support for this older architecture).  And there is a 8/10/12 bit newer distro that handles 8 or 10 or 12 bits that has \textit{multibit} as part of the filename.  Installing the appimage is simple:
+For 64-bit systems you can choose between an image with up-to-date libraries or one that supports older libraries, which you should use only if the first image gives you problems with unsupported libs. There is also a 32-bit older distro available that has \textit{i686} as part of the filename that currently works on older distros but may not work on the newest distros
+(most of the popular Linux distributions such
+as Arch, Ubuntu, and Fedora have dropped support for this older architecture). In any case, if you are using a 32-bit Linux distro, you should compile your sources from git or use a precompiled binary\protect\footnote{Remember that a 32-bit distro does not address more than 4GB of memory, so you may have stability and performance problems with large, high-resolution mediafiles.}. And there is a 8/10/12 bit newer distro that handles 8 or 10 or 12 bits that has \textit{multibit} as part of the filename.  Installing the appimage is simple:
 
 Download the file from:
 
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ you get the added benefit of the latest checked in changes, please reference
 ~\ref{sec:How_to_build}.
 %
 A Windows 10 version installation is described in~\ref{sec:ms_windows10}.  There are also 32-bit i686 Ubuntu, Debian,
-and Slackware versions available. \textbf{These binaries are no longer being updated; they are stable and working but without future functionality}.
+and Slackware versions available\protect\footnote{Remember that a 32-bit distro does not address more than 4GB of memory, so you may have stability and performance problems with large, high-resolution mediafiles.}. \textbf{These binaries are no longer being updated; they are stable and working but without future functionality}.
 They are in subdirectories of:
 
 \begin{list}{}{}
@@ -144,7 +144,7 @@ caption={README.pkgs}
 
 These are generic build instructions for building \CGG{} Infinity.
 Known to work on Ubuntu, Mint, OpenSuse, Fedora, Debian, Centos,
-Arch, Slackware, and Gentoo.  It has not been tested on every
+Arch, Slackware, and Gentoo. Compiling from git is perhaps the best way to get \CGG{} on 32-bit systems\protect\footnote{Remember that a 32-bit distro does not address more than 4GB of memory, so you may have stability and performance problems with large, high-resolution mediafiles.}. It has not been tested on every
 single possible distro yet so you might expect to have to make
 some minor changes.  Also works on a somewhat limited basis on
 FreeBSD and Windows 10 with the bsd.patch for FreeBSD and the
@@ -1024,7 +1024,7 @@ must run from an external console window to avoid this issue.
 \CGG{} can be run on Android (without audio), a non-x86 mostly posix system,
 tablet or phone after installing TERMUX, the \textit{terminal emulator}.
 You will have to do your own build using the file in Cinelerra's
-\textit{blds} subdirectory, \textit{termux.bld}.
+\texttt{blds} subdirectory, \texttt{termux.bld}.
 Because this is a relatively new capability and of lesser use, some
 additional effort may have to be exerted on your part to get it going
 but it is easy to get help by contacting the mailing list.
@@ -1043,10 +1043,10 @@ Some requirements include;
 \item Install takes 5 GB of internal storage. In addition you can download videos,
 and other files with wget to one specific location at sdcard after running termux-setup-storage
 inside termux (it will prompt you to give access to sdcard graphically the first time used).
-\item If you have empty versions of locale.alias, locale.dir,
+\item If you have empty versions of \texttt{locale.alias}, \texttt{locale.dir},
  and
-\newline \$PREFIX/share/X11/locale/en\_US.UTF-8/XLC\_LOCALE
- you will have to request non-empty versions via the mailing list.
+\newline \texttt{\$PREFIX/share/X11/locale/en\_US.UTF-8/XLC\_LOCALE}
+\newline you will have to request non-empty versions via the mailing list.
 \item Some helpful information on installing the X environment is at:
  \url{https://wiki.termux.com/wiki/Graphical\_Environment}
 \item To prevent crashing when loading a video file that has audio, use the guide
@@ -1055,8 +1055,7 @@ inside termux (it will prompt you to give access to sdcard graphically the first
 \end{enumerate} 
 
 A little more about Audio is presented next because you will need to have this running
-in order to prevent a crash (even though you still will not be able to hear audio) -
-there does not seem to be a simple PA client in termux itself.
+in order to prevent a crash (even though you still will not be able to hear audio) -- there does not seem to be a simple PA client in termux itself.
 Some information is available at:
  \url{https://android.stackexchange.com/questions/205576/how-to-play-sound-from-termux-when-using-linux} .
 
@@ -1095,8 +1094,8 @@ Now to start up \CGG{}, type in:
         $ PULSE_SERVER=127.0.0.1 ./cin.sh
 \end{lstlisting}
 
-You can even build a package version similiar to Debian, just with "pkg search pkg\_name / pkg install
- pkg\_name" instead of "apt search/install pkg\_name" and with "*-static" instead of "*-dev/-devel packages".
+You can even build a package version similiar to Debian, just with "\texttt{pkg search} pkg\_name / \texttt{pkg install}
+ pkg\_name" instead of "\texttt{apt search/install} pkg\_name" and with "\texttt{*-static}" instead of "\texttt{*-dev/-devel} packages".
 For more information on this, see:
 
 \url{https://wiki.termux.com/wiki/Package\_Management}
@@ -1183,10 +1182,7 @@ so it is of no value.
 \label{sec:multibit_build}
 \index{multibit}
 
-To build a version that can handle 8 bit, or 10 bit, or 12 bit videos,
-a patch is provided in the \texttt{thirdparty} subdirectory that needs
-to be applied to do so.  Be aware that the compile may take more time
-and seems to be about twice as long. To apply the required patch:
+To build a version that can handle 8 bit, or 10 bit, or 12 bit videos, a patch is provided in the \texttt{thirdparty} subdirectory that needs to be applied to do so.  Be aware that the compile may take more time and seems to be about twice as long. To apply the required patch:
 
 \begin{lstlisting}[style=sh]
 cd /path/to/cinelerra-5.1/thirdparty
index 40f15a9caa1deb1d861a455c0f446a55dd2b1b9f..8d65f2b0f5cdd1800580b7580dd6e8834ef2e152 100644 (file)
@@ -282,7 +282,6 @@ The file you created in the Render step should now be playable.  You can test th
 \index{format}
 \index{codec}
 
-
 Here is an overview of the formats (also called containers) and codecs that are used in \CGG{}, by ffmpeg and the internal engine. Roughly speaking these are divided into uncompressed codecs (or codecs with \textit{Intraframe} compression, which can be lossy or lossless) and compressed codecs of \textit{Interframe} type (LongGOP, almost always with lossy compression). The All-I (intraframe) codecs are suitable for editing because a cut or other operation on the timeline corresponds to the exact frame on which you are operating. The interframe types use Groups of Pictures (GOP) and a cut or other operation is accurate (and requires no further calculation) only if it coincides with the beginning of the GOP, and not with an internal frame. There is also color compression: Color Space \textit{bit-depth} and \textit{Chroma-Subsampling} for YUV models. In addition, heavy compression requires the system to do more encoding/decoding work on the timeline. High quality codecs have high bit rates and bit depths but this also affects the performance of the system, not to mention the increased disk space usage. Some formats implement both audio and video streams, others audio only or video only.  
 
 \subsection{Video FFmpeg Formats}%
@@ -329,7 +328,7 @@ These are also called Delivery codecs. They are the most used and widespread bei
        \item[MP4] The most popular. Many other formats belong to this family (MPEG);
        \newline    h264 is actually x264, open, highly configurable and documented; h265/HEVC is actually x265, open, highly configurable and documented. x264-5 is for encoding only.
        \newline Presets: \textit{h265, h265, mjpeg, mpeg2, obs2youtube}
-       \item[WEBM] Open; similar to mp4 but not as widespread (it is used by YouTube). In \CGG{} there are specific Presets with \texttt{.youtube} extension, but they are still webm.
+       \item[WEBM] Open; similar to mp4 but not as widespread (it is used by YouTube). It belongs to the Matroska family. In \CGG{} there are specific Presets with \texttt{.youtube} extension, but they are still webm.
        \newline Presets:  \textit{VP8, VP9, AV1}
        \item[MKV] Open, highly configurable and widely documented. It might have seeking problems. It belongs to the Matroska family.
        \newline Presets:  \textit{Theora, VP8, VP9}