Change pagestyle to ruled
[goodguy/cin-manual-latex.git] / parts / Windows.tex
1 \chapter{The 4+ Windows}%
2 \label{cha:the_4_windows}
3
4 \section{Program Window}%
5 \label{sec:program_window}
6
7 The main window is called the Program window and contains the timeline as well as the entry point for all menu driven operations.  
8 It is often just called the “timeline”.  
9 The timeline consists of a vertical stack of tracks with a horizontal representation of time. 
10 This defines the output of rendering operations and what is saved when you save files. 
11 To the left of the timeline is the patchbay which contains options affecting each track.  
12 The patchbay is described in detail in the Editing section.
13
14 The \emph{Window} pulldown on this main window contains options that affect the 4 main windows. 
15 \emph{Default} positions repositions all the windows to a 4 screen editing configuration.
16 On dual headed displays,
17 the Default positions operation fills only one monitor with windows.
18
19 \subsection{Video and Audio Tracks and Navigation}%
20 \label{sub:video_and_audio_tracks_and_navigation}
21
22 The program window (figure~\ref{fig:pathbay})   contains many features for navigation and displays the timeline as it is structured in memory: tracks stacked vertically and extending across time horizontally. 
23 The horizontal scroll bar allows you to scan across time. 
24 The vertical scroll bar allows you to scan across tracks.
25
26 \begin{figure}[htpb]
27     \centering
28     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{images/pathbay.png}
29     \caption{Patchbay  | Timeline with pulldowns \& navigation icons, Video/Audio tracks \& bottom Zoom}
30     \label{fig:pathbay}
31 \end{figure}
32
33
34 Video tracks represent the duration of your videos and clips, just as if you placed real photographic film stock end-to-end on a table. 
35 The individual images you see on the track are samples of what is located at that particular instant on the timeline.
36
37 Audio tracks represent your sound media as an audio waveform. 
38 Following the film analogy, it would be as if you "viewed" magnetic tape horizontally on your table. 
39 You can adjust the horizontal and vertical magnification of the tracks and the magnification of the audio "waveform" display using the zoom panel controls. 
40 Every track on the timeline has a set of attributes on the left, called the patch- bay. 
41 It is used to control some of the behavior of the tracks.
42
43 Track Navigation involves both selecting a specific audio or video track and moving to a certain time in the track. 
44 The vertical scroll bar allows you to scan across tracks. 
45 For vertical scrolling you can also use the mouse wheel. 
46 The horizontal scroll bar allows you to scan across time. For horizontal scrolling you can use the mouse wheel with the Ctrl key.  
47
48 In addition to the graphical tools, you can use the keyboard to navigate.  
49 There is a shortcuts document for keyboard navigation; it includes, for example, shortcuts like use the Home and End keys to instantly go to the beginning or end of the timeline.  
50 Or in the default cut and paste mode, hold down Shift while pressing Home or End in order to select the region of the timeline between the insertion point and the key pressed.
51
52 \subsection{Zoom Panel}%
53 \label{sub:zoom_panel}
54
55 Below the timeline, you will find the zoom panel. 
56 The zoom panel contains values for sample zoom (duration visible on the timeline), amplitude (audio waveform scale), track zoom (height of tracks in the timeline), and curve zoom (automation range). 
57 In addition to the scrollbars, these zooms are the main tools for positioning the timeline.  
58 Also on the zoom panel is selection change and alpha slider.
59
60 \begin{figure}[htpb]
61     \centering
62     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{images/zoompanel.png}
63     \caption{Zoom panel on the bottom of the main program window}
64     \label{fig:zoompanel}
65 \end{figure}
66
67 Changing the \emph{sample zoom} causes the unit of time displayed in the timeline to change size. 
68 It allows you to view your media all the way from individual frames to the entire length of your project. 
69 The higher the setting, the more frames you can see per screen. 
70 The sample zoom value is not an absolute reference for the unit of time since it refers to the duration visible on the timeline and thus changes also as you modify the length of the program window horizontally.
71 Use the Up and Down arrows to change the sample zoom by a power of two. 
72 Or if your mouse has a wheel, mouse over the tumblers and use the wheel to zoom in and out.
73
74
75 The \emph{amplitude} only affects audio which determines how large the waveform appears. Ctrl-up and Ctrl-down cause the amplitude zoom to change.
76
77 The \emph{track zoom} affects all tracks. 
78 It determines the height of each track. 
79 If you change the track zoom, the amplitude zoom compensates so that the audio waveforms look proportional. 
80 Ctrl-pgup and Ctrl-pgdown cause the track zoom to change.
81
82 The \emph{curve zoom} affects the curves in all the tracks of the same type. 
83 It determines the value range for curves. 
84 First select the automation type (audio fade, video fade, zoom, X,Y) then use the left tumblers for the minimum value and the right tumblers for the maximum value or manually enter the values in the text box. 
85 Normally you will use -40.0 to 6.0 for audio fade and 0.0 to 100.0 for video fade. 
86 The tumblers change curve amplitude, but the only way to curve offset is to use the fit curves button.
87
88 The \emph{selection start time}, \emph{selection length}, and \emph{selection end time} display the current selected timeline values.  
89 The \emph{alpha slider} allows for varying the alpha value when using colors on the tracks as set in your appearance preferences for Autocolor assets.  
90 It has no function without that flag set.
91
92 \subsection{Track Popup Menu}%
93 \label{sub:track_popup_menu}
94
95 Each Track has a popup menu. 
96 To activate the track popup menu, Right mouse click on the track. 
97 The popup menu affects the track whether the track is armed on the patchbay or not. 
98 The Track Menu contains a number of options:
99
100 \begin{description}
101     \item[Attach Effect] opens a dialog box of effects applicable to the type of track of audio or video.
102     \item[Move up] moves the selected track one step up in the stack.
103     \item[Move down]  moves the selected track one step down in the stack.
104     \item[Delete track]  removes the track from the timeline.
105     \item[Add Track]  adds a track of the same media type, audio or video, as the one selected above that track.
106     \item[Find in Resources]  that media file will be highlighted in the media folder in the Resources window.
107     \item[Show edit]  will point out the exact start and stop points along with the length of the current edit on
108         that track as well as the media name.
109     \item[User title]  is used to change the title name.  This is really handy for files that have very long and
110         similar names that would get cut off during edits.  You can use short names to better differentiate the
111         media. If you select multiple, all those clips will have title name changed.
112     \item[Bar color]  allows the user to select a specific color for the title bar.  This helps ease of locating.
113     \item[Resize Track]  resizes the track.
114     \item[Match Output Size]  resizes the track to match the current output size.
115 \end{description}
116
117
118 \subsection{Insertion Point}%
119 \label{sub:insertion_point}
120
121 The insertion point (figure~\ref{fig:insertion-points}) is the flashing hairline mark that vertically spans the timeline in the program window. 
122 Analogous to the cursor on your word processor, the insertion point marks the place on the timeline where the next activity will begin. 
123 It is the point where a paste operation takes place. 
124 When rendering, it defines the beginning of the region of the timeline to be rendered. It is also the starting point of all playback operations.
125                            
126 Normally, the insertion point is moved by clicking inside the main timebar. 
127 Any region of the timebar not obscured by labels and in or out points is a hotspot for repositioning the insertion point. 
128 In cut and paste editing mode only, the insertion point can be moved also by clicking in the timeline itself. 
129 When moving the insertion point the position is either aligned to frames or aligned to samples. 
130 When editing video, you will want to align to frames. When editing audio you will want to align to samples. Select your preference by using Settings->Align cursor on frames.
131
132 \begin{figure}[htpb]
133     \centering
134     %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{name.ext}
135     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
136         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{images/insertion-point.png}};
137         \node [yshift=-13mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Pulldowns) {Pulldowns};
138         \node [yshift=-20mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Transport) {Transport \& Buttons Bar};
139         \node [yshift=-27mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Timebar) {Timebar};
140         \node [yshift=-33mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Title) {Media Title };
141         \node [yshift=-43mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Video) {Video Track};
142         \node [yshift=-63mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Audio) {Audio Track};
143         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Pulldowns) edge  ([yshift=-13mm] img1.north west);
144         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Transport) edge  ([yshift=-20mm] img1.north west);
145         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Timebar) edge    ([yshift=-27mm] img1.north west);
146         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Title) edge      ([yshift=-33mm] img1.north west);
147         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Video) edge      ([yshift=-43mm] img1.north west);
148         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Audio) edge      ([yshift=-63mm] img1.north west);
149         \end{tikzpicture}
150     
151     \caption{Insertion point is at 0:00:25:10 in Hr:Mn:Sec:Frames}
152     \label{fig:insertion-points}
153 \end{figure}
154
155
156 \subsection{Editing Modes}%
157 \label{sub:editing_modes}
158
159 There are 2 different editing methods of operation that affect the insertion point and the editing on the timeline.  
160 There is:  \emph{drag and drop mode} and \emph{cut and paste mode}. 
161 The editing mode is determined by selecting the arrow or the I-beam in the Transport and Buttons bar. 
162
163 If the arrow is highlighted, it enables \emph{drag and drop mode}.  
164 In drag and drop mode, clicking in the timeline does not reposition the insertion point.  
165 Double-clicking in the timeline selects the entire edit the mouse pointer is over.  
166 Dragging in the timeline repositions the edit the mouse pointer is over. 
167 This is useful for reordering audio playlists, sorting movie scenes, or moving effects around. 
168 To cut and paste in drag and drop mode you need to set in/out points to define an affected region. 
169
170 If the I-beam is highlighted it enables \emph{cut and paste mode}. 
171 In cut and paste mode, clicking in the timeline repositions the insertion point. 
172 Double-clicking in the timeline selects the entire edit the cursor is over. 
173 Dragging in the timeline highlights a region. 
174 The highlighted region becomes the region affected by cut and paste operations and the playback range during the next playback operation. 
175 Shift-clicking in the timeline extends the highlighted region.
176
177 When highlighting a region, the start and end points are either aligned to frames or aligned to samples. When editing video, you will want to align to frames. When editing audio you will want to align to samples. Select your preference by using settings$\rightarrow$align cursor on frames.
178
179 \begin{figure}[htpb]
180     \centering
181     \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{images/i-beam.png}
182     \caption{I-beam + in/out  +  labels}
183     \label{fig:i-beam}
184 \end{figure}
185
186 \subsection{In/Out Points}%
187 \label{sub:in_out_points}
188
189 In both editing modes, you can set one In point and one Out point. 
190 The in/out points define the affected region. 
191 In drag and drop mode, they are the only way to define an affected region. 
192 In both cut and paste mode and drag and drop mode, the highlighted area overrides the In/Out points. 
193 If a highlighted area and In/Out points are set, the highlighted area is affected by editing operations and the In/Out points are ignored. 
194 If no region is highlighted, the In/Out points are used. 
195 To avoid confusion, it is better to use either highlighting or In/Out points but not both simultaneously.
196
197 To set in/out points, go to the timebar and position the insertion point somewhere. 
198 Select the In point button. 
199 Move the insertion point to a position after the In point and click the Out point button. 
200 Instead of using the button bar, you can use the [ or < and ] or > keys to toggle in/out points.
201
202 If you set the insertion point somewhere else while In/Out points already exist, when you click the In/Out buttons the existing points will be repositioned. 
203 If you click on in/out points while a region is highlighted, the insertion point will be ignored and In/Out points will be set at the beginning and at the end of the highlighted area.
204
205 If you select either the In point or the Out point, the insertion point will jump to that location. 
206 After selecting an In point, if you click the In point button the In point will be deleted. 
207 After selecting an Out point, if you click the Out point button the Out point will be deleted. 
208 Shift-clicking on an In/Out point highlights the region between the insertion point and that In/Out point. 
209 If a region is already highlighted, it extends the highlighted region up to that In/Out point.
210
211 To quickly get rid of In/Out points, without caring about where they are or if they are set or not, just double click on [ and ] buttons. 
212 The first click will set a new point or reposition an old one at the insertion point; the second click will delete it. This trick does not work if the In point or the Out point is already set at insertion point.
213
214 Some of the useful operations concerning the In/Out pointers are listed next.
215
216 \begin{description}
217     \item[Ctrl-KeyPad\#]  if in/out set, KP 2,3,5,6 + Enter, play between In/Out point
218     \item[Shift-Ctrl]  loops play between In/Out points
219     \item[Click in/out] while holding the left mouse button, drags In/Out pointer elsewhere
220     \item[Shift-Ctrl] with transport button, loops play between In/Out points
221     \item[Ctrl-t]  clears both In/Out points
222 \end{description}
223
224 \subsection{Labels}%
225 \label{sub:labels}
226
227 The insertion point and the In/Out points allow you to define an affected region, but they do not let you jump to exact points on the timeline very easily. 
228 Labels are an easy way to set exact locations on the timeline that you want to jump to. 
229 When you position the insertion point somewhere and click the label button, a new label appears on the timeline. 
230 With label traversal you can quickly seek back and forth on the timeline.
231
232 No matter what the zoom settings are, clicking on the label highlights it and positions the insertion point exactly where you set the label. 
233 The lower case letter “L” is a shortcut for the label button.
234
235 Labels can reposition the insertion point when they are selected but they can also be traversed with the label traversal buttons. When a label is out of view, the label traversal buttons reposition the timeline so the label is visible. Keyboard shortcuts for label traversal are:
236
237 \begin{description}
238     \item[Ctrl-left] repositions the insertion point on the previous label.
239     \item[Ctrl-right] repositions the insertion point on the next label.
240 \end{description}
241
242 The Label folder in the Resources window lists the timestamp of every label. 
243 You can edit the label list and add a title for every item using the popup menu. 
244 To open the Label info dialog right click on the label icon in the Resources window or directly on the label symbol on the timebar. 
245 With labels you can also select regions:
246
247 \begin{description}
248     \item[Shift-Ctrl-left] highlights the region between the insertion point and the previous label.
249     \item[Shift-Ctrl-right] highlights the region between the insertion point and the next label.
250     \item[Double-clicking] on the timebar between two labels highlights the region between the labels.     
251     \item[Shift-clicking] on a label highlights the region between that label and the insertion point.
252         If a region is already highlighted, it extends the highlighted region up to that label.
253 \end{description}
254
255
256 If you hit the label button when a region is highlighted, labels are created at each end of the highlighted region. 
257 However, if one end already has a label, then the existing label is deleted. 
258 Hitting the label button again when a label is selected deletes it. 
259 Manually hitting the label button or L key over and over again to delete a series of labels can get tedious. 
260 To delete a set of labels, first highlight a region, then use the Edit$\rightarrow$Clear labels function. 
261 If in/out points exist, the labels between the in/out points are cleared and the highlighted region is ignored.
262
263
264 In Cut and Paste editing mode only, by enabling \emph{Edit labels} in the settings menu or by disabling the \emph{Lock labels from moving} button on the program toolbar, labels will be cut, copied or pasted along with the selected region of the first armed track. 
265 Similarly, if a selected area of a resource is spliced from the viewer to the timeline in a position before labels, these labels will be pushed to the right on the timebar for the length of the selected area. 
266 To prevent labels from moving on the timebar, just disable the \emph{Edit labels} option or enable the \emph{Lock labels from moving} button.
267
268
269 Originally in Drag and Drop editing mode labels will be always locked to the timebar, even with the \emph{Edit labels} option enabled.  
270 This may no longer be correct in all cases. 
271
272 \subsection{Color Title Bars and Assets}%
273 \label{sub:color_title_bars_and_assets}
274
275 In order to visually aid in locating clips on the timeline that are from the same media file, you can have them auto-colored or self-colored.  
276 Use of this feature requires additional memory and cpu on every timeline redraw, therefore it is recommended that smaller computers leave it turned off.
277
278 For auto-color the color will be based on a hashed filename so that whenever you load this particular media, it will always have the same color on the title bar even if you use proxy.  
279 To enable auto-color (figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets}, go to Settings$\rightarrow$Preferences, Appearance tab and check on “Autocolor assets”.  
280 It is disabled by default.  
281 Each media will have a random muted color and there could easily be close duplicates as generated by the program algorithm.  There will be no total black, but some dark shades are possible.  
282
283 Screencast shows the red colored checkmark to enable Autocolor assets.  
284 In the lower left corner is Highlighting Inversion color which can also be set and is discussed elsewhere.
285
286 \begin{figure}[htpb]
287     \centering
288     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{images/autocolor-assets.png}
289     \caption{Autocolor assets}
290     \label{fig:autocolor_assets}
291 \end{figure}
292
293 To change a specific clip to your own chosen color, middle mouse button over that clip and an Edits popup will be displayed.  
294 Choose the option \emph{Bar Color} to bring up the color picker and choose a color.   
295 You can also change the alpha value in the color picker and this alpha takes precedence over the current alpha slider bar value unless it was set to 1.0.   
296 The color will only change after you click on the checkmark.  
297 The \emph{Bar Color} option works in either Drag and Drop or Cut and Paste editing mode and also works if “Autocolor assets” is not set.  
298 In Drag and Drop editing mode, if you select several clips and then bring up the Edits popup with the middle mouse button over a track, you can use the \emph{Bar Color} option to change all of those selected to the same color.
299
300 To go back to the default colors, uncheck “Autocolor assets” in Preferences, but this does not affect the specially chosen self-colored ones as they are preserved.  
301 To change these individually or  selectively use the Edits popup \emph{Bar Color} option and click on “Default” in the color picker window.  Auto-color does not honor armed/disarmed tracks.  
302 Self-color does honor armed/disarmed tracks.
303
304 And that’s not all!  
305 There is an \emph{alpha fader slider bar} on the bottom of the main window on the right hand side of what is referred to as the Zoom Panel.  
306 With this alpha slider, you can colorize your video and audio tracks to either see only the color at 0.0 or see only the image/audio waveform at 1.0.  
307 This slider bar affects all colored areas of the Autocolor assets and the self-colored ones.  
308 In the case when a specifically changed edit alpha value is any value except 1, the slider bar will not affect that.  
309 Once you use the slider bar, it is activated so gets first shot at any keystrokes in the main window.  
310 You deactivate this by simply clicking in a different part of the main window.  
311
312 As long as we are on the subject of color, just a reminder that you can also change the “Highlighting Inversion color” in Settings$\rightarrow$Preferences, Appearance tab.  
313 This is on right left hand side of the menu more than half the way down and you can see this in the figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets}.  
314 That setting defaults to white (ffffff) but sometimes this is a little bright so you can put any hex value in that suits you.
315
316 Screencast (figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}a) which shows an example of the Autocolor assets with alpha set to 0.0.
317 In this screencast (figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}b), the alpha is set to show the image as well as the colors.  The pink media file has been self-colored rather than the autocolor to make it easy to see.
318
319 \begin{figure}[htpb]
320     \centering
321     \begin{minipage}[h]{0.55\linewidth}
322         \center{\includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{images/autocolor-assets_alpha0.png}} \\ a)
323     \end{minipage}
324     \begin{minipage}[h]{0.4\linewidth}
325         \center{\includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{images/autocolor-assets_alpha1.png}} \\ b)
326     \end{minipage}
327     \caption{An example of the Autocolor assets}
328     \label{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}
329 \end{figure}
330
331
332 \subsection{More about Pulldowns}%
333 \label{sub:more_about_pulldowns}
334
335 The main window pulldowns are quite obvious in their meaning and usage, so here is only a summary.  
336 %TODO Figure 3 shows an example of the pulldowns as displayed in the main window.
337
338
339 \begin{description}
340     \item[File]  options for loading, saving, and rendering as described in other sections.
341     \item[Edit]  edit functions; most of which have shortcuts that you will quickly learn.
342     \item[Keyframes]  keyframe options which are described in the Keyframe section.
343     \item[Audio]  audio related functions such as “Add track”, “Attach transition/effect”.
344     \item[Video]  video functions such as “Default/Attach transition”.
345     \item[Tracks]  move or delete tracks are the most often used.
346     \item[Settings]  this is mostly described in other sections.  
347         However, typeless keyframes are not described
348         anywhere else.  
349         They allow keyframes from any track to be pasted on either audio or video tracks.
350     \item[View]  for display or modifying asset parameters and values to include Fade, Speed, and Cameras.
351     \item[Window]  window manipulation functions.
352 \end{description}
353
354
355 \subsection{Window Layouts}%
356 \label{sub:window_layouts}
357
358 If you like to use different window layouts than the default for certain scenarios, you can setup, save, and load 4 options.   
359 First position your Cinelerra windows where you want them to be and then use the Window pulldown and choose \emph{Save layout}.  
360 To use the default name of Layout \#, when the popup comes up, just click the green checkmark OK on the Layout popup menu.  
361 If you would like a specific name for your layout so you can remember what it is for, keyin 1-8 english characters that are meaningful to you (english characters mean you can not use the German umlaut or the French accent).  
362 Legal characters are a-z, A-z, 0-9, \_ (the underscore character) and a limit of 8 total.  
363 If you keyin more than 8, only the last 8 characters will be used.  
364 To rename a currently existing layout, use the Save layout option again on the one to rename, and keyin a different name into the text box or blank for the default name (figure~\ref{fig:window_layouts}).
365
366 \begin{figure}[htpb]
367     \centering
368     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
369         \center{\includegraphics[width=1\linewidth]{images/window_layout1.png}}\\ a)
370         %TODO High res image replace
371     \end{minipage}
372     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
373         \vspace{13ex}
374         \center{\includegraphics[width=1\linewidth]{images/window_layout2.png}}\\ b)
375         %TODO Alpha channel
376     \end{minipage}
377     \caption{Window Layouts}
378     \label{fig:window_layouts}
379 \end{figure}
380
381 The files containing the coordinates for your layouts will automatically be saved in the \texttt{\$HOME/.bcast} directory as \texttt{layout\#\_rc} or \texttt{layout\#\_8chars\_rc}.
382
383 To use the desired layout, keyin the shortcut or use the Window pulldown and choose \emph{Load layout} and then make your choice. 
384
385 \subsection{Just Playing!}%
386 \label{sub:just_playing_}
387 What if you are just using Cinelerra to play media and listen to tunes? 
388 After loading your media, just hit the space bar to start playing and then again to stop playing.  
389 Other than that, use the transport buttons on the top bar of the Program window.  
390 Other ways, not previously mentioned to “play around” are described next. 
391
392 \subsubsection*{Repeat Play / Looping Method}%
393 \label{ssub:repeat_play_looping_method}
394
395 There are 2 methods for repeat play or looping on the timeline and 1 method for both the Compositor and the Viewer.  This works in conjunction with any of the transport buttons or shortcuts in either forward or reverse as usual.  The 1 exception is that the Shift button can not be used to either add or subtract audio within the repeat area.
396
397
398 \emph{Shift-L on the Timeline}, repeats the selection per the algorithm outlined next.  
399 When setup, long green lines are displayed across the entire set of tracks which shows the start and end of the loop.
400 \begin{enumerate}
401     \item  Highlighted selection repeats loop and takes precedence over all other possibilities.  
402         If the cursor is before the highlighted area, it will play up to the area and then repeat the highlighted section.  
403         If the cursor is after the highlighted section, play will start at the beginning until you get to the
404         highlighted section and then repeat.
405     \item  When both In and Out pointers are set, it repeats the section between [ and ].
406     \item  If only one of the In or Out pointers is set, it loops the whole media.
407 \end{enumerate}
408
409 \emph{Ctrl+Shift+transport button on the Timeline, Viewer, and Compositor}
410
411 \begin{enumerate}
412     \item Repeats entire media if no In or Out pointer set.
413     \item  In and Out pointer set, repeats area between pointers.
414     \item  Only In pointer set, repeats from In to end of media.
415 \end{enumerate}
416
417 \subsubsection*{Last Play Position Memory}%
418 \label{ssub:last_play_position_memory}
419
420
421 When you play media, the start/end playback positions are saved as if they had been made into temporary labels.  
422 They appear on the timeline as purple/yellow hairline markers representing the last start/end labels for the last playback. 
423 They can be addressed as if they are label markers using:
424
425 \begin{description}
426     \item[Ctrl$\leftarrow$]   tab to the label before the cursor, that is “play start”
427     \item[Ctrl$\rightarrow$]   tab to the label after the cursor, that is “play stop”
428 \end{description}
429
430
431 You can use these markers for re-selection.  
432 Additionally, the selection region can be expanded by “pushing” the markers using single frame playback.  
433 Use frame reverse (keypad 4) to push the start play marker backward, or use frame forward (keypad 1) to push the end play marker forward.
434
435 Another handy feature is to use the combination of Ctrl-shift-arrow (left or right) to select the media from the cursor position (red hairline) to the start or end marker by “tabbing” to the label markers.  
436 For example, tab to the beginning of the previous play region using Ctrl-left-arrow to move the cursor to the beginning of last play, then press Ctrl-Shift-right-arrow to tab to the end of the playback region. 
437 Now you can clip/play/expand or edit the previous playback selection.
438
439 \begin{description}
440     \item[Ctrl SHIFT$\rightarrow$]        tab cursor to label right of cursor position and expand selection
441     \item[Ctrl SHIFT$\leftarrow$]         tab cursor to label left of cursor position and expand selection
442 \end{description}
443
444
445 \subsubsection*{Playback Speed Automation Support}%
446 \label{ssub:playback_speed_automation_support}
447
448
449 The speed automation causes the playback sampling rate to increase or decrease to a period controlled by the speed automation curve.  
450 This can make playback speed-up or slow-down according to the scaled sampling rate, as “time is multiplied by speed” (speed X unit\_rate).
451
452 \subsubsection*{Alternative to using Numeric Keypad for Playing}%
453 \label{ssub:alternative_to_using_numeric_keypad_for_playing}
454
455
456 For the keyboards without a numeric keypad or if you prefer to use keys closer to where you normally type, there are alternative keys for the play/transport functions.  These are listed below.
457
458 \begin{tabular}{lcl}
459         Alt + m&=&stop playback\\
460
461         Alt + j&=&forward single frame\\
462
463         Alt + k&=&forward slow playback\\
464
465         Alt + l&=&forward normal playback\\
466
467         Alt + ;&=&forward fast playback\\
468
469         Alt + u&=&reverse single frame\\
470
471         Alt + i&=&reverse slow playback\\
472
473         Alt + o&=&reverse normal playback\\
474
475         Alt + p&=&reverse fast playback\\
476 \end{tabular}
477 \begin{minipage}{.45\linewidth}
478 + Shift key, results in the reverse of whether audio is included or not.
479 \vspace{1ex}
480
481 + Ctrl, results in the transport function operating only between the in/out pointers.
482 \end{minipage}
483
484 \section{Compositor Window}%
485 \label{sec:compositor_window}
486
487 The Compositor window (figure~\ref{fig:compositor_window}) displays the output of the timeline. 
488 It is the interface for most compositing operations or operations that affect the appearance of the timeline output. 
489 Operations done in the Compositor affect the timeline but do not affect clips.
490
491 \begin{figure}[htpb]
492     \centering
493     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{images/compositor_window.png}
494     \caption{Upper right side contains navigation tools / bottom bar has manu control functions}
495     \label{fig:compositor_window}
496 \end{figure}
497
498 \subsection{Compositor controls}%
499 \label{sub:compositor_controls}
500
501
502 Navigating the video output does not affect the rendered output; it just changes the point of view in the compositor window. 
503 The video output has several navigation functions. 
504 The video output size is either locked to the window size or unlocked with scrollbars for navigation. 
505 The video output can be zoomed in and out and panned. 
506 If it is unlocked from the window size, middle clicking and dragging anywhere in the video pans the point of view. Hitting the + and - keys zooms in and out of the video output.
507
508 Underneath the video output are copies of many of the functions available in the main window. 
509 In addition there is a zoom menu and a tally light. 
510 The zoom menu jumps to all the possible zoom settings and, through the Auto option, locks the video to the window size. 
511 The zoom menu does not affect the window size. 
512 The tally light turns red when rendering is happening. This is useful for knowing if the output is current. 
513 Right clicking anywhere in the video output brings up a menu with all the zoom levels, zoom auto mode, and some other options. 
514 In this particular case the zoom levels resize the entire window and not just the video. 
515 The \emph{Reset camera} and \emph{Reset projector} options center the camera and projector. 
516 The \emph{Hide controls} option hides everything except the video. 
517
518 On the left of the video output is a toolbar specific to the compositor window. The toolbar has the following functions:
519
520 \emph{Protect video} --- disables changes to the compositor output from clicks in it. It is an extra layer on top of the track arming toggle to prevent unwanted changes.
521
522 \emph{Magnifying glass} --- this tool zooms in and out of the compositor output without resizing the window. If the video output is currently locked to the size of the window, clicking in it with the magnifying glass unlocks it and creates scrollbars for navigation.
523
524 \begin{description}
525     \item[Left clicking] in the video zooms in;
526     \item[Ctrl clicking] in the video zooms out;
527     \item[Rotating the wheel] on a wheel mouse zooms in and out.
528 \end{description}
529
530 In addition, if you enable the Magnifying glass, a zoom slider for fine-viewing appears below these tools.  
531 It allows you to zoom to most any size. 
532 A “zoom slider” will pop-up towards the bottom on the left-hand side of the Compositor when you enable “Zoom view” via the magnifying glass or when you click on the icons for “Adjust camera automation” or “Adjust projector automation”.  
533 This will allow for adjusting the amount of zoom at any level between 0.01 and 100 based on a logarithmic scale.  
534 When using the zoom slider, the number by which the view is zoomed can be seen in the textbox where the original-also-working \% zoom is located.  
535 The zoom slider size is in the form of “times”, such as x 0.82 which indicates that the picture is zoomed to 82/100th of the original size as seen in Settings$\rightarrow$Format.  
536 Once you have set the zoom to the desired size, use the vertical and horizontal scroll bars to position the view as needed.
537
538 Screencast (figure~\ref{fig:zoom_slider}) shows below at a zoom slider bar with the diamond shaped slider in the middle.  Note 
539 that the magnifying glass is  enabled which automatically pops-up the slider.
540
541 \begin{figure}[htpb]
542     \centering
543     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{images/zoom_slider.png}
544     \caption{A zoom slider bar with the diamond shaped slider in the middle}
545     \label{fig:zoom_slider}
546 \end{figure}
547 The Format shows a large 5204x3468 video and the box at the arrow shows x 0.82 size.  
548
549 \begin{description}
550     \item[Masks tool] this tool brings up the mask editing tool. Enable “Show tool info” to see the options.
551     \item[Camera]  the camera brings up the camera editing tool. Enable “Show tool info” to see options.
552     \item[Projector]  the projector brings up the projector editing tool. Enable “Show tool info” for options.
553     \item[Crop tool]  this tool brings up the cropping tool. “Show tool info” must be enabled to use this tool.
554     \item[Eyedropper]  brings up the eyedropper. The eyedropper detects whatever color is under it and stores it
555         in a temporary area. Enabling the “Show tool info” shows the currently selected color. Click
556         anywhere in the video output to select the color at that point. The eyedropper not only lets you see
557         areas which are clipped, but its value can be applied to many effects. Different effects handle the
558         eyedropper differently.
559     \item[Show tool info]  this tool button works only in conjunction with the other controls on the compositor.
560         Based on what compositing control is active, the toggle button will activate or deactivate the
561         appropriate control dialog box. Controls with dialog boxes are: Edit mask, Camera and Projector
562         automation, Crop control, and Get color.
563     \item[Safe regions tool]  draws the safe regions in the video output. This does not affect the rendered output
564 \end{description}
565
566 \subsection{Compositing}%
567 \label{sub:compositing}
568
569 A large amount of Cinelerra's editing is directed towards compositing. 
570 Changing the resolution of a show, making a split screen, and fading in and out among other things are all compositing operations in Cinelerra. 
571 Cinelerra detects when it is in a compositing operation and plays back through the compositing engine only then. 
572 Otherwise, it uses the fastest decoder available in the hardware.
573
574 Compositing operations are done on the timeline and in the Compositor window. Shortcuts exist in the Resource window for changing some compositing attributes. 
575 Once some video files are on the timeline, the compositor window is a good place to try compositing.
576
577 \subsection{Camera and Projector}%
578 \label{sub:camera_and_projector}
579
580 In the compositor window, two of the more important functions are the adjust camera automation and the adjust projector automation which control operation of the camera and projector. 
581 Cinelerra's compositing routines use a "temporary", a frame of video in memory where all graphics processing is performed. 
582 Inside Cinelerra's compositing pipeline, the camera determines where in the source video the "temporary" is copied from. 
583 The projector determines where in the output the "temporary" is copied to. 
584 Each track has a different "temporary" which is defined by the track size. By resizing the tracks you can create split screens, pans, and zooms.
585
586 In compositing, each frame can be digitally altered using various options, such as a color correction plugin (figure~\ref{fig:camera_and_projector}). 
587 Once the image has been transformed, the finished image is then projected to the compositor thus creating a modified version of the original.
588
589 \begin{figure}[htpb]
590     \centering
591     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{images/camera_and_projector.png}
592     \caption{Camera and Projector}
593     \label{fig:camera_and_projector}
594 \end{figure}
595
596 When editing the camera and projector in the compositing window, the first track with record enabled is the track affected. 
597 Even if the track is completely transparent, it is still the affected track. 
598 If multiple video tracks exist, the easiest way to select one track for editing is to Shift-click on the record icon of the track. 
599 This solos the track.
600
601 The purpose of the projector is to place the contents of the "temporary" into the project's output. 
602 The intent of the projector is to composite several sources from the various tracks into one final output track. 
603 The projector alignment frame is identical to the camera's viewport, except that it guides where on the output canvas to put the contents of each temporary.
604
605 \subsubsection*{Compositing projector controls}%
606 \label{ssub:compositing_projector_controls}
607
608 When the projector button is enabled in the compositor window, you are in projector editing mode. 
609 A guide box appears in the video window. 
610 Dragging anywhere in the video window causes the guide box to move along with the video. 
611 Shift-dragging anywhere in the video window causes the guide box to shrink and grow along with the video. Once you have positioned the video with the projector, you may want to work with adjusting the camera automation.
612
613 \subsubsection*{Compositing camera controls}%
614 \label{ssub:compositing_camera_controls}
615
616 Select the camera button to enable camera editing mode. 
617 In this mode, the guide box shows where the camera position is in relation to past and future camera positions but not where it is in relation to the source video. 
618 Dragging the camera box in the compositor window does not move the box but instead moves the location of the video inside the box. 
619 The viewport is a window on the camera that frames the area of source video to be scanned. 
620 The viewport is represented as a red frame with diagonal cross bars.
621
622 \subsubsection*{Viewport sizes}%
623 \label{ssub:viewport_sizes}
624
625 The size of the viewport is defined by the size of the current track. 
626 A smaller viewport (640x400) captures a smaller area. 
627 A larger viewport (800x200) captures an area larger than the source video and fills the empty spaces with blanks. 
628 Once we have our viewport defined, we still need to place the camera right above the area of source video we are interested on. To control the location of the camera:
629
630 \begin{enumerate}
631     \item  Open the compositor window with a track selected.
632     \item  Select the camera button to enable camera editing mode.
633     \item  Drag over the display window.
634 \end{enumerate}
635
636 When we drag over the viewport in the compositor window, the way it looks is as if you “move the camera with the mouse”.  The viewport also moves with it.
637
638 In the compositing window, there is a popup menu of options for the camera and projector. Right click over the video portion of the compositing window to bring up the menu.
639
640 \begin{description}
641     \item[Reset Camera] causes the camera to return to the center position.     
642         \item[Reset Projector] causes the projector to return to the center.
643 \end{description}
644
645 \subsubsection*{The camera and projector tool window}%
646 \label{ssub:the_camera_and_projector_tool_window}
647
648 The camera and projector have shortcut operations that do not appear in the popup menu and are not represented in video overlays. 
649 These are accessed in the \emph{Show tool info} window. 
650 Most operations in the Compositor window have a tool window which is enabled by activating the question mark icon.
651
652 \begin{wrapfigure}[12]{O}{0.3\linewidth} 
653         \vspace{-4ex}
654     \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{images/camera_tool.png}
655     \caption{Camera and Projector tool}
656     \label{fig:images/camera_tool}
657 \end{wrapfigure}
658
659 In the case of the camera and projector, the tool window shows x, y, and z coordinates. 
660 By either tumbling or entering text directly, the camera and projector can be precisely positioned.  
661 Justification types are also defined for easy access. 
662 A popular justification operation is upper left projection after image reduction. 
663 This is used when reducing the size of video with aspect ratio adjustment.  
664 In the last figure you see the choices for justification as the red stripe in the 6 boxes in the order of left, center horizontal, right, top, center vertical, and bottom.
665
666 The translation effect allows simultaneous aspect ratio conversion and reduction but is easier to use if the reduced video is put in the upper left of the “temporary” instead of in the center. 
667 The track size is set to the original size of the video and the camera is centered. 
668 The output size is set to the reduced size of the video. 
669 Without any effects, this produces just the cropped center portion of the video in the output.
670
671 The translation effect is dropped onto the video track. The input dimensions of the translation effect are set to the original size and the output dimensions are set to the reduced size. 
672 To put the reduced video in the center subsection that the projector shows would require offsetting out x and out y by a complicated calculation. 
673 Instead, we leave out x and out y at 0 and use the projector's tool window. 
674 By selecting left justify and top justify, the projector displays the reduced image from the top left corner of the “temporary” in the center of the output.
675
676 \subsection{Masks}%
677 \label{sub:masks}
678
679 Masks select a region of the video for either displaying or hiding. 
680 Masks are also used in conjunction with another effect to isolate the effect to a certain region of the frame. 
681 A copy of one video track may be delayed slightly and unmasked in locations where the one copy has interference but the other copy does not. 
682 Color correction may be needed in one subsection of a frame but not another. 
683 A mask can be applied to just a subsection of the color corrected track while the plain track shows through. 
684 Removal of boom microphones and airplanes are a common kind of mask uses.
685
686 The order of the compositing pipeline affects what can be done with masks. Mainly, masks are performed on the temporary after effects and before the projector. This means multiple tracks can be bounced to a masked track and projected with the same mask.
687
688 The compositing pipeline graph has a masking stage. 
689 There are 8 possible masks per track. Each mask is defined separately, although they each perform the same operation, whether it is addition or subtraction.
690
691 \subsubsection*{Compositing pipeline with masks}%
692 \label{ssub:compositing_pipeline_with_masks}
693
694 \begin{enumerate}
695     \item To define a mask, go into the Compositor window and enable the mask toggle.
696     \item  Next go over the video and click-drag. 
697         Note: You have to select automatic keyframes if you wish to move a mask over time.  
698         If you do not, the mask position will be the same even if you edit at different places on the timeline.
699     \item  Click-drag again in another part of the image to create each new point of the mask. 
700         While it is not the conventional Bezier curve behavior, this masking interface performs in realtime what the effect 
701         of the mask is going to be. Creating each point of the mask expands a rubber band curve.
702
703         Once points are defined, they can be moved by Ctrl-dragging in the vicinity of the corner. 
704         Shift-drag allows you to move existing points to new locations, thus altering the shape of the mask.  
705         However, this does not smooth out the curve. 
706         The In/Out points of the Bezier curve are accessed by Ctrl-dragging in the vicinity of the corner. 
707         Then Ctrl-dragging near the In or Out point causes the point to move.  
708         Shift-drag activates bezier handles to create curves between mask points.       
709
710     \item  Finally once you have a mask, the mask can be translated in one piece by Alt-dragging the mask.
711         The effect of the mask is always on.  
712         Ctrl-Alt-drag translates an entire mask to a new location on the
713         screen.
714 \end{enumerate}
715
716 The masks have many more parameters which could not be represented with video overlays. 
717 These are represented in the tool window for masks. 
718 Selecting the question mark when the mask toggle is highlighted brings up the mask options window (figure~\ref{fig:mask_window}).
719
720 \begin{figure}[htpb]
721     \centering
722     \includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{images/mask_window.png}
723     \caption{Mask options window}
724     \label{fig:mask_window}
725 \end{figure}
726
727 The mode of the mask determines if the mask removes data or makes data visible. 
728 If the mode is \emph{Subtract alpha}, the mask causes video to disappear. 
729 If the mode is \emph{Multiply alpha}, the mask causes video to appear and everything outside the mask to disappear.
730
731 The \emph{Value of the mask}, set by a slider bar, determines how extreme the subtraction or addition is. 
732 In the subtractive mode, higher values subtract more alpha. 
733 In the additive mode, higher values make the region in the mask brighter while the region outside the mask is always hidden.
734
735 The \emph{Mask number} determines which one of the 8 possible masks we are editing. 
736 Each track has 8 possible masks. 
737 When you click-drag in the compositor window, you are only editing one of the masks. 
738 Change the value of mask number to cause another mask to be edited. 
739 The previous mask is still active but only the curve overlay for the currently selected mask is visible. 
740 When multiple masks are used, their effects are OR-ed together. 
741 Every mask in a single track uses the same value and mode.
742
743 The edges of a mask are hard by default but this rarely is desired. 
744 The \emph{Feather} parameter determines how many pixels to feather the mask. 
745 This creates softer edges but takes longer to render. 
746
747 Two checkbox options are \emph{Apply mask} before plugins and \emph{Disable OpenGL masking}.  
748 Note that the OpenGL mask renderer is of low quality and only suitable as a preview for initial work. 
749 For fine-tuning of masks (with large feather values) \emph{OpenGL masking} should be switched off so that the software renderer is used instead.
750
751 Finally, there are parameters which affect one point on the current mask instead of the whole mask. 
752 These are \emph{Delete}, \emph{X}, and \emph{Y}. 
753 The active point is defined as the last point dragged in the compositor window. 
754 Any point can be activated merely by Ctrl-clicking near it without moving the pointer. 
755 Once a point is activated, \emph{Delete} deletes it and \emph{X}, \emph{Y} allow repositioning by numeric entry.
756
757 \subsection{Cropping}%
758 \label{sub:cropping}
759
760
761
762 Cropping reduces the visible picture area of the whole project. It changes the values of the output dimensions (width and height in pixels) and the X, Y values of the projector in a single operation. Since it changes project settings it affects all the tracks for their entire duration and it is not keyframable. 
763
764 \begin{figure}[htpb]
765     \centering
766     \includegraphics[width=0.5\linewidth]{images/cropped_area.png}
767     \caption{Cropped area is in the top right corner}
768     \label{fig:images/cropped_area}
769 \end{figure}
770
771 \begin{itemize}
772     \item Enable the crop toggle and the tool window in the compositor window to display the Crop control dialog box.
773     \item Click-drag anywhere in the video to define the crop area. This draws a rectangle over the video.
774     \item Click-drag anywhere in the video to start a new rectangle.
775     \item Click-drag over any corner of the rectangle to reposition the corner.
776     \item Alt-click in the cropping rectangle to translate the rectangle to any position without resizing it.
777     \item The crop control dialog allows text entry of the top left coordinates (X1,Y1) and bottom right coordinates (X2,Y2) that define the crop rectangle. 
778         When the rectangle is positioned, hit the \emph{Do it} button in the crop control dialog to execute the cropping operation: the portion of the image outside  the rectangle will be cut off and the projector will make the output fit the canvas.
779     \item The Set Format window will show the new project Width and Height values.
780     \item The projector tool window will show the new X, Y values.
781     \item Track size will remain unchanged.
782 \end{itemize}
783  
784 To undo the cropping enter the original project dimensions in the Set Format window and click on Reset projector in the popup menu of the compositor.
785
786 \subsection{Safe Regions}%
787 \label{sub:safe_regions}
788
789 On consumer displays the borders of the image are cut off and within the cut-off point is a region which is not always square like it is in the compositor window. 
790 The borders are intended for scratch room and vertical blanking data. 
791 You can show where these borders are by enabling the safe regions toggle. 
792 Keep titles inside the inner rectangle and keep action inside the outer rectangle.
793
794 \begin{figure}[htpb]
795     \centering
796     \includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{images/safe_regions.png}
797     \caption{Note the black frames showing the safe regions}
798     \label{fig:safe_regions}
799 \end{figure}
800
801 \subsection{Track and Output Sizes}%
802 \label{sub:track_and_output_sizes}
803
804
805 The size of the temporary and the size of the output in our compositing pipeline are independent and variable. 
806 The camera's viewport is the temporary size. 
807 Effects are processed in the temporary and are affected by the temporary size. 
808 Projectors are rendered to the output and are affected by the output size. 
809 If the temporary is smaller than the output, the temporary is bordered by blank regions in the output. 
810 If the temporary is bigger than the output, the temporary is cropped.
811
812 \subsubsection*{Track size}%
813 \label{ssub:track_size}
814
815 The temporary size is defined as the track size. 
816 Each track has a different size. 
817 Right click on a track to bring up the track's menu. 
818 Select \emph{Resize Track} to resize the track to any arbitrary size. 
819 Alternatively you can select \emph{Match output size} to make the track the same size as the output. 
820 If you resize a track, then its appearance on the compositor changes accordingly. 
821 Using the relationship between the track and the project's output size you can effectively reduce or magnify the size of a particular track with regards to the final output and therefore create visual effects like split screens, pans, and zooms on the compositor.
822
823 \subsubsection*{Output size}%
824 \label{ssub:output_size}
825
826
827 The output size is set in either File$\rightarrow$\emph{New} when creating a new project or Settings$\rightarrow$\emph{Format}. 
828 In the Resources window there is another way to change the output size. 
829 Right click on a video asset and select \emph{Match project size} to conform the output to the asset. 
830 When new tracks are created, the track size always conforms to the output size specified by these methods.
831
832 When rendering, the project's output size is the final video track size where the temporary pipeline is rendered into.  
833 If the output size is larger than the temporary then the image transferred from the temporary will fit inside the Output Track. 
834 Any space left on the Output is left blank.  
835 If the output size is smaller than the temporary then some of the temporary video will be cropped.
836
837
838