a few improved Recording images in Cakewalk theme
[goodguy/cin-manual-latex.git] / parts / Windows.tex
1 \chapter{Interface (the 4+ Windows)}%
2 \label{cha:the_4_windows}
3 \index{interface}
4
5 \begin{figure}[htpb]
6     \centering
7     \includegraphics[width=\linewidth,keepaspectratio]{Fenstergrundposition-en.png}
8     \captionsetup{labelformat=empty, textformat=empty}
9     \caption[The four windows (cc-by-sa Olaf)]{No text}    
10     \label{fig:Fenstergrundposition-en}
11 \end{figure}
12
13 First it is important to know what an EDL is. When \CGG{} saves a file, it saves the EDL,
14 Edit Decision List, of your project which contains all the settings and locations of edits
15 and pointers to the media so that the media is not modified. The EDL is described in \nameref{sec:edl_edit_decision_list}.
16
17 \section{Program Window}%
18 \label{sec:program_window}
19 \index{program window}
20
21 The main window is called the \textit{Program} window and is often just referred to as the \textit{timeline} \index{timeline}.  Here is where you enter the main menu operations.  
22 This timeline consists of a vertical stack of tracks with time represented horizontally on the track. 
23 It is the output of the rendering operations and this is what is saved when you run the \textit{File} pulldown, Save command.
24 Immediately to the left of the timeline is the patchbay \index{patchbay}. The patchbay contains options that affect each track.  
25 These options are described in great detail in \nameref{sec:patchbay}.
26
27 The \textit{Window} pulldown on the main window contains options
28 that affect the 4 main windows. The first 3 options are used to
29 display each of the windows in case one was accidentally closed.
30 You can move or resize the windows as needed, save that particular
31 layout, and revert to the default positions to reposition all 4
32 windows to the original screen configuration.  On dual headed
33 displays, the \textit{Default positions} operation only uses the one
34 monitor to display the windows, but as you can see in the
35 \textit{Window} pulldown you have more options to change that with the
36 2 \textit{tile} options. Usage with dual monitors is explained
37 in~\nameref{sec:playback_a_b}.
38
39 \subsection{Video and Audio Tracks and Navigation}%
40 \label{sub:video_and_audio_tracks_and_navigation}
41
42 The \textit{Program} window (figure~\ref{fig:patchbay}) has many features for navigation and displays the timeline as it is structured in memory. The tracks are stacked vertically with horizontal movement over time.
43 There is a vertical scroll bar which allows for moving across tracks and a horizontal scroll bar for scanning across time. 
44
45 \begin{figure}[htpb]
46     \centering
47     \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{patchbay.png}
48     \caption{Patchbay  | Timeline with pulldowns, navigation icons, Video/Audio tracks | bottom Zoom Panel}
49     \label{fig:patchbay}
50 \end{figure}
51
52 Video tracks represent the duration of your media, just as if you placed old-fashioned rolls of photographic
53 film one right after the other on a table.
54 Individual images that are drawn on each track are snapshots of what is located at that place on the timeline.
55
56 Audio tracks represent the sound media as an audio waveform, or if you change a preference setting, a rectified audio waveform. 
57 This too looks like old-fashioned digital magnetic tape laid out horizontally across a table.
58 Using the \textit{Zoom Panel} controls at the bottom of the timeline,
59 you can adjust the horizontal and vertical size of the video and audio waveform displays.
60 Each track on the timeline has a set of attributes on its left side in the patchbay which is used to 
61 control some options of that particular track. 
62
63 Track navigation is performed by selecting a video or audio track and moving to a certain time in the track. 
64 Use the vertical scroll bar to scan across tracks, or even easier you can use the mouse wheel. 
65 And use the horizontal scroll bar to scan across time, or again even easier, you can use the mouse wheel with the Ctrl key.  
66
67 Once you have become familiar with many of the graphical tools and pulldowns, you can switch to using more of
68 the keyboard to navigate.  Many of the key equivalences are listed in each of the pulldowns to the right of the option
69  as a shortcut. All of the shortcuts are listed in a document for keyboard 
70 navigation (\nameref{cha:shortcuts}). This includes, for example, shortcuts like the \texttt{Home} and \texttt{End} keys to go to the beginning or end of the timeline.  
71 Another example is in the default cut and paste mode, hold down \texttt{Shift} while pressing \texttt{Home} or \texttt{End} in order to select the region of the timeline between the insertion point and the key pressed.
72
73 \subsection{Transport and Buttons Bar}%
74 \label{sub:transport_buttons}
75 \index{transport buttons}
76
77 This is a short description of what is contained on the \textit{Transport and Buttons Bar} as seen in
78 figure~\ref{fig:insertion-points}.
79 Each of the symbols has an associated tooltip as an easy reminder of its function.  The usage of
80 several is described in a little more detail in other areas of this manual. 
81
82 \vspace{2ex}
83 \begin{tabular}{ll}
84    \hline
85         First set of 3 symbols & Move in the reverse direction on the timeline \\
86         4th symbol & Stop play \\
87         Third set of 3 symbols & Move in the forward direction on the timeline \\
88         Next 2 symbols & Set editing mode \\
89         Generate keyframes while tweaking & Explained in \ref{sec:generate_keyframe_tweaking}\\
90         Allow keyframe spanning & Explained in \ref{sec:allow_keyframes_spanning}\\
91         Lock labels from moving with edits & Toggle to lock or not lock labels from moving \\
92         Next 2 are In and Out pointers & Set or unset In and Out to define an area \\
93         To Clip & Create a clip of the designated area \\
94         Split / Cut & Split/Cut at insertion or selected area \\
95         Next 2 symbols & Usual Copy and Paste functions \\
96         Next 3 symbols & Label manipulation functions  \\
97         Next 2 symbols & Used to move to other edits  \\
98         Next 2 symbols & Fitting video to the display  \\
99         Next 2 symbols & Undo and Redo last operation  \\
100         Manual Go To & Explanation after this table  \\
101         Set Timecode & Explained in \ref{sub:align_timecodes}  \\
102         Gang Modes & Explained in \ref{sub:displaying_tracks_ganged} \\
103    \hline
104 \end{tabular}
105
106 The \textit{Manual Go To} \index{goto} menu is quite versatile as you can see in figure~\ref{fig:goto_menu}.  The
107 options of \textit{=} represents goto the position indicated in the textbox; \textit{+} indicates
108 to goto forward the additional number in the textbox; and \textit{-} means to go in the reverse
109 direction the number in the textbox.  If you use \textit{Enter} in the textbox, the menu will stay
110 up so that you can use it without having to continuously pop it up.  If you use the OK check instead, 
111 the menu will be taken down.  The pulldown arrow to the right of the textbox sets the
112 \textit{Time Format} \index{time format} for the units to be used for position changing.  This lets you change the units
113 without having to modify your Preference. 
114
115 \begin{figure}[htpb]
116     \centering
117     \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{goto.png}
118     \caption{Goto position menu}
119     \label{fig:goto_menu}
120 \end{figure}
121
122 \textit{Time Format} options are:
123
124 \begin{tabular}{ll}
125    \hline
126         h:mm:ss.sss & hours minutes seconds milliseconds  \\
127         h:mm:ss:ff & hours minutes seconds frames  \\
128         timecode  \\
129         video frames  \\ 
130         audio samples  \\
131         audio samples (hex)  \\
132         ssss.sss & milliseconds.xx  \\
133         video frames (feet)  \\
134    \hline
135 \end{tabular}
136
137 \subsection{Zoom Panel}%
138 \label{sub:zoom_panel}
139 \index{zoom!panel}
140
141 Below the displayed tracks in the timeline, you will find the zoom panel as seen in figure~\ref{fig:patchbay}.
142 In addition to the scrollbars, these options and their values are another set of tools for positioning the timeline.  
143 In order of appearance in the zoom panel as rectangular boxes and either tumbler arrows or a up/down arrow, this next list shows each option along with its tooltip description if available.
144 Then more details are provided in the next paragraphs.
145
146 \vspace{2ex}
147 \begin{tabular}{ll}
148    \hline
149         Sample zoom & Duration visible on the timeline \\
150         Amplitude & Audio waveform scale \\
151         Track audio zoom & Height of audio tracks \\
152         Track video zoom & Height of video tracks \\
153           (type) & Automation Type \\
154         Curve zoom & Automation range minimum and maximum \\
155         Selection change & 3 boxes with starting point, length, and ending point \\
156         Alpha slider & Slider bar to control alpha value for colored assets \\
157    \hline
158 \end{tabular}
159
160 Changing the \emph{sample zoom} changes the amount of time displayed on the timeline 
161 so you can see your media as individual frames or as the entire length of your media. 
162 To see more frames, use a higher setting. 
163 The sample zoom value is not an absolute time reference because it refers to the duration visible on the timeline. It will change as you modify the length of the program window horizontally.
164 You can either use the $\uparrow$ and $\downarrow$ arrows to change the sample zoom by a power of two, or use the mouse wheel on the tumblers to zoom in and out.
165
166
167 The next option is \emph{amplitude} and it only affects the audio waveform \index{waveform} size. \texttt{Ctrl-$\uparrow$} and \texttt{Ctrl-$\downarrow$} are shortcuts used to change the amplitude zoom as an alternative to the down arrow to the right of the numerical size.
168
169 The \emph{track audio and video zoom} affects all tracks of that type and determines the height of each track. 
170 If you change the audio track zoom, the amplitude zoom will be changed also so that the audio waveforms
171 are proportionally sized.
172 Shortcuts, \texttt{Ctrl-Pgup} and \texttt{Ctrl-Pgdown}, change the track zoom to the next level simultaneously for all of the audio and video tracks.
173
174 \emph{Automation type} \index{autos} is used for selecting one of the following: Audio Fade, Video Fade, Zoom, Speed, X, or Y (X and Y are for the compositor's Camera and Projector).  When an auto line is present on
175 the timeline and is being manipulated, a small square the same color as the line will be shown to 
176 the left of the Automation type when the left mouse button (LMB) is pressed.  This is just an indicator to make it easy to see what is being worked.
177  
178 The \emph{curve zoom} \index{autos!zoom} affects the curves for the selected \emph{automation type} in all the tracks of that type and determines the value range for those curves. 
179 Use the tumbler arrows to the left of the numbers for the minimum value and the tumblers to the right for the maximum value, or manually enter the values in the text box. 
180 Good default values for audio fade are -40.0 to 6.0 and for video fade are 0.0 to 100.0. 
181 The tumbler arrows change curve amplitude, but the only way to curve offset is to use the fit curves button on the curve itself.
182
183 The \emph{selection start time}, \emph{selection length}, and \emph{selection end time} \index{timeline!selection} display the current selected timeline values. When there is no selection, both the start and end time are the current
184 position of the timeline and the selection length is 0.
185 The \emph{alpha slider} \index{alpha slider} allows for varying the alpha value when using colors on the tracks as set in your \texttt{Preferences $\rightarrow$ Appearance} for \texttt{Autocolor assets}.  
186 It has no function without that flag set.
187
188 There are 3 additional pieces of information in the line immediately below the \textit{zoom panel}.
189 In the lower left hand corner there could be messages such as "Welcome to \CGG{}" when there is no 
190 need to display a red-colored error message or a line that reads "Rendering took H:MM:SS" after a render
191 has just been completed. Or when working with an auto, a small square the color of the last changed auto line, will be
192 present along with its keyframe type, location on the timeline, and its current value.  This is simply
193 for easy recognition of what is being worked. The second piece of helpful information is all the way to
194 the right which is a long rectangular box indicating the percentage completion of a render. Finally
195 there is an X with the tooltip of "Cancel operation" \index{cancel operation} used to stop an ongoing render
196 (the cancel operation may seem slow due to the amount of data still in the buffer upon cancellation).
197
198 \subsection{Track Popup Menu}%
199 \label{sub:track_popup_menu}
200 \index{track!popup menu}
201
202 Each Track has a popup menu. 
203 To activate the track popup menu, Right mouse click (RMB) on the track. 
204 The popup menu affects the track whether the track is armed on the patchbay or not. 
205 The Track Menu contains a number of options:
206
207 \begin{description}
208     \item[Attach Effect] \index{attach effect} opens a dialog box of effects applicable to the type of track of audio or video.
209     \item[Move up] allows for changing the order of the tracks up; the actual code refers
210 to this as a swap. Disarmed tracks affect the results.
211     \item[Move down]  allow for changing the order of the tracks down; the actual code refers
212 to this as a swap.  Disarmed tracks affect the results.
213     \item[Roll up] moves the tracks one step up in the stack with the top track going to the bottom.  This is applicable to all armed and disarmed tracks.
214     \item[Roll down]  moves the tracks one step down in the stack with the
215 bottom track going to the top.  This is applicable to all armed and disarmed tracks.
216     \item[Delete track]  removes the track from the timeline.
217     \item[Add Track]  adds a track of the same media type as the one selected, audio or video, above the selected track.
218     \item[Find in Resources] \index{find in resources}  the media file on that track at the location of the insert pointer will be highlighted in the media folder in the Resources window. If the 
219         Resources window is closed, media is found and highlighted but the Resources window is not displayed.
220     \item[Show edit] \index{show edit}  will point out the exact start and stop points along with the length of the current edit on
221         that track as well as the media name, track name and number, and edit number.
222     \item[User title] \index{user title}  is used to change the title name.  This is really handy for files that have very long and
223         similar names that would get cut off during edits.  You can use short names to better differentiate the
224         media. In Drag and Drop editing mode, if you select multiple edits all of those clips will have
225 their title name changed.
226     \item[Bar color] \index{bar color} allows the user to select a specific color for the title bar.  This helps to more easily locate a piece of media.
227     \item[Resize Track] \index{resize track} resizes the track; this is only applicable to video tracks.
228     \item[Match Output Size] \index{match output size} resizes the track to match the current output size; this is only applicable to video tracks.
229 \end{description}
230
231
232 \subsection{Insertion Point}%
233 \label{sub:insertion_point}
234 \index{insertion point}
235
236 The insertion point (figure~\ref{fig:insertion-points}) is the vertical hairline mark that spans the timeline in the program window - it can be a solid line but most of the time it will be flashing. 
237 Like the cursor on a word processor, the insertion point marks the place on the timeline where the next
238 operation will begin. It is the starting point of all play operations and is the point where a paste operation will occur. 
239 In some cases, when rendering it defines the beginning of the region of the timeline to be rendered. 
240
241 To move the insertion point, you move the mouse inside the timebar \index{timebar} area and click with the left mouse button. 
242 You can use any place on the timebar to reposition the insertion point as long as that spot is not blocked
243 by In/Out point \index{in/out point} or a label \index{label}. 
244 In cut and paste editing mode, you can also change the position of the insertion point with a simple 
245 left mouse click in the timeline itself.
246 When moving the insertion point, the position is either aligned to frames or aligned to samples. 
247 For best results, \textit{Align cursor on frames} \index{Align cursor on frames} when editing a video track and \textit{Align to samples} \index{Align to samples} when editing audio. 
248 Use the pulldown \texttt{Settings$\rightarrow$Align cursor on frames} to change the alignment by
249 checking the box on for video and off for audio.
250
251 \begin{figure}[htpb]
252     \centering
253     %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{name.ext}
254     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
255         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0]
256          {\includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{insertion-point.png}};
257         \node [yshift=-5mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Pulldowns) {Pulldowns};
258         \node [yshift=-10mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Transport) {Transport \& Buttons Bar};
259         \node [yshift=-15mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Timebar) {Timebar};
260         \node [yshift=-20mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Title) {Media Title };
261         \node [yshift=-28mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Video) {Video Track};
262         \node [yshift=-46mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Audio) {Audio Track};
263         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Pulldowns) edge  ([yshift=-5mm] img1.north west);
264         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Transport) edge  ([yshift=-10mm] img1.north west);
265         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Timebar) edge    ([yshift=-15mm] img1.north west);
266         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Title) edge      ([yshift=-20mm] img1.north west);
267         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Video) edge      ([yshift=-28mm] img1.north west);
268         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Audio) edge      ([yshift=-46mm] img1.north west);
269         \end{tikzpicture}
270     
271     \caption{Insertion point is at 0:00:25:10 in Hr:Mn:Sec:Frames}
272     \label{fig:insertion-points}
273 \end{figure}
274
275
276 \subsection{Editing Modes}%
277 \label{sub:editing_modes}
278 \index{drag and drop}
279 \index{cut and paste}
280
281 There are 2 different editing modes for operations which affect how the insertion point and editing
282 on the timeline operate.  
283 There is:  \emph{drag and drop mode} and \emph{cut and paste mode}. 
284 The editing mode is determined by selecting the \texttt{arrow} \index{arrow}, or immediately to the right of the arrow,
285 the \texttt{I-beam} \index{i-beam} in the Transport and Buttons bar. In figure~\ref{fig:insertion-points} you can see
286 the green colored highlight \protect\footnote{green is used in the default Cakewalk theme, but the highlight color will be different in other themes} on the arrow icon indicating that you are currently in 
287 \emph{drag and drop mode}.
288
289 With the arrow highlighted for \emph{drag and drop mode}, a double click with the left mouse button in the timeline selects the edit the mouse pointer is over. 
290 Then dragging in the timeline repositions that edit and this can be used for moving effects,
291 changing the order of playlists, or moving video pieces around. 
292 There are numerous methods to cut and paste in \emph{drag and drop mode} by setting In/Out points to define
293 a selected region or using the Copy/Paste Behavior as outlined in~\ref{sub:copy_paste_behavior}. 
294 In this mode, clicking the LMB in the timeline does not reposition the \textit{Insertion Point}. 
295
296 When the I-beam is highlighted, you are in \emph{cut and paste mode}.
297 In cut and paste mode, clicking the LMB in the timeline does reposition the \textit{Insertion Point}. 
298 Double clicking in the timeline selects the entire edit the cursor is over, i.e.\ that column. 
299 Dragging in the timeline with the LMB pressed down, highlights a selected region and this is the region that is affected by cut
300 and paste operations.  It is also the playback range used for the subsequent playback operation. 
301 Holding down the Shift key while clicking in the timeline extends the highlighted region.
302
303 \begin{figure}[htpb]
304     \centering
305     \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{i-beam.png}
306     \caption{I-beam + in/out  +  labels}
307     \label{fig:i-beam}
308 \end{figure}
309
310 \subsection{In/Out Points}%
311 \label{sub:in_out_points}
312 \index{in/out point}
313
314 The In/Out points, displayed on the timebar \index{timebar} by [ and ] brackets,  can be set in either of the editing modes to define the selection.
315 In the timebar, a colored bar will show between these 2 brackets to better outline the area selected.
316 In \emph{drag and drop mode} \index{drag and drop}, they are an easy way to define a selected region.
317
318 It is important to remember that a highlighted area overrides the In/Out points. That is, if a highlighted area and In/Out points are both set, the highlighted area is changed by editing operations and the In/Out points are ignored. 
319 But if no region is highlighted, the In/Out points are used. 
320 To avoid confusion, use either highlighting or In/Out points but not both at the same time.
321
322 To set In/Out points, in the timebar move to the position where you want the Insertion point \index{insertion point} and click the In
323 point icon or one of the [ or < keys.
324 Then move the insertion point to a position after the In point and click the ] or > or the Out point icon. 
325 You can use these same icons or keyboard characters to toggle In/Out points on or off.
326
327 If you set the insertion point in another place when In/Out points are already set, that existing point will be
328 repositioned when you click the In/Out icon or keyboard equivalent. 
329 If you click on In/Out points while a region is highlighted, the insertion point will be ignored and In/Out points will be set at the beginning and at the end of the highlighted area.
330
331 When you select either the In or Out point on the timebar, the insertion point will move to that location. Note that when the insertion point is at the exact position of an In or Out point, the bracket will change
332 color making it easy to see that you are exactly at that spot.
333  
334 If only the In point is set, when you click the In point icon the In point will be deleted. 
335 If only the Out point is set, when you click the Out point icon the Out point will be deleted. 
336 Holding the Shift key while clicking on an In/Out point, the area between the insertion point and that
337 In/Out point will be highlighted or extended to that In/Out point if already highlighted. 
338
339 An easy way to turn off the In/Out points if both are set, is to double click on the [ icon in the toolbar. 
340 If you have already set the In and Out points, and then move the insertion point anywhere to the left of
341 the Out point, a LMB click on the [ icon will move the In point to the location of the insertion point.  In the same
342 manner if you move the insertion point anywhere to the right of the In point, a LMB click on the ] icon
343 will move the Out point to that new position.  However, if you move the insertion point for either the
344 In or Out point beyond what makes sense to designate In/Out points, the bracket you clicked on will be
345 moved to the insertion point and the other bracket will be eliminated.  That is obviously because the
346 In point has to come before the Out point on the timeline.
347
348 Some of the useful operations concerning the In/Out pointers are listed next.
349
350 \begin{description}
351     \item[Ctrl-KeyPad\#]  if In/Out set, \texttt{KP 2,3,5,6 + Enter}, play between In/Out points
352     \item[Shift-Ctrl]  loops play between In/Out points
353     \item[Click In/Out] while holding the LMB down, drags In/Out pointer where you drag to
354     \item[Shift-Ctrl] with a transport button (e.g. Fast Forward), loops play between In/Out points
355     \item[Ctrl-t]  clears both In/Out points
356 \end{description}
357
358 \subsection{Labels}%
359 \label{sub:labels}
360 \index{label}
361
362 Labels are used in order to set exact locations on the timeline that you want to be able to easily get to. 
363 To create a label, position the insertion point \index{insertion point} at a location and click on the label icon in the Transport
364 and Buttons bar. The new label is displayed on the timebar \index{timebar} as a down arrow at that location as shown in
365 figure~\ref{fig:i-beam}.  Whenever the insertion point is at the same position as a label, it changes
366 color to emphasize that it is exactly at that spot.
367 Labels make it so you can jump back and forth to exact marked locations on the timeline.
368 Use the lower case letter “\texttt{L}” as a shortcut for the label button.
369
370 You can use labels to reposition the insertion point when that label is selected. They are also
371 especially useful for moving along the timeline to the \textit{Next label} or \textit{Previous label}
372 with the buttons on the Transport and Buttons bar to the right of the Labels button.  
373 When moving along the timeline with the Next or Previous label buttons, if a label is out 
374 out of view the timeline will automatically be repositioned so that the label is visible.
375 If you perform a \textit{Next label} operation and there are no more, the insertion point
376 will go to the End position.  Conversely if you perform a \textit{Previous label} operation
377 and there are no more labels, the insertion point will go to the Home position. 
378 Keyboard shortcuts for label traversal are:
379
380 \begin{description}
381     \item[Ctrl-left] moves the insertion point to the previous label.
382     \item[Ctrl-right] moves the insertion point to the next label.
383 \end{description}
384
385 There is a  Label folder in the Resources window which has a list of every label and its exact location
386 where the label is. The location is based on the timestamp, frame number, or sample number depending on the selected Time Format of your timebar. 
387 You can edit, delete, or goto a label by clicking the RMB on that label in the Resources window which
388 brings up a popup menu with those options.  It can be quite helpful to \textit{edit} the label
389 and add a text string to help identify what the label represents.
390 In addition, RMB clicking the label symbol on the timebar brings up a textbox displaying the current
391 text string and allowing you to change it. If a Label has been given a name, simply mousing over
392 the label symbol on the timebar will display that string.
393
394 With labels you can also select regions:
395
396 \begin{description}
397     \item[Shift-Ctrl-left] highlights the area between the insertion point and the previous label.
398     \item[Shift-Ctrl-right] highlights the area between the insertion point and the next label.
399     \item[Double-clicking] on the timebar between two labels, highlights the area between the labels.      
400     \item[Shift-clicking] on a label, highlights the area between that label and the insertion point.
401         If an area is already highlighted, it extends the highlighted area up to that label.
402 \end{description}
403
404 If you LMB click the label button when an area is highlighted, labels are created at each end of the
405 highlighted area. 
406 When a label is selected, if you click on the label icon, the label will be deleted. 
407 To delete multiple labels, highlight that area, then use the \texttt{Edit $\rightarrow$ Clear $\rightarrow$ Clear labels}
408 function to delete them all. The same precedence rules apply to this operation as mentioned earlier.  That
409 is, if both In/Out points are set and there is a highlighted area also set, the highlighted area's 
410 labels will be cleared and not those between the In/Out points.
411
412 If you enable \emph{Edit labels} in the \textit{Settings} pulldown menu or disable the \emph{Lock labels from moving}
413 button on the Transport and Buttons bar, labels will be cut, copied or pasted along with the selected
414 area of the first armed track. 
415 In the same manner, if a selected area of media is spliced from the viewer to the timeline in a position 
416 before labels, the labels will be moved to the right on the timebar so that the label maintains its 
417 relative position to its edit. 
418 To prevent labels from moving on the timebar, enable the \emph{Lock labels from moving} icon or
419 disable the \emph{Edit labels} option under the \textit{Settings} pulldown.
420
421 \subsection{Color Title Bars and Assets}%
422 \label{sub:color_title_bars_and_assets}
423 \index{bar color}
424 \index{asset!color}
425 In order to visually aid in locating clips on the timeline that are from the same media file, you can have them auto-colored or self-colored.  Auto-color is
426 an automatic system to always color the files on the timeline when loaded. 
427 Self-color is a manual coloring requiring the user to take definitive action.
428 Use of this feature requires additional memory and cpu on every timeline redraw, therefore it is recommended that smaller computers leave it turned off.
429
430 For auto-color the color will be based on a hashed filename so that whenever you load this particular media, it will always have the same color on the title bar even if you use proxy.  
431 To enable auto-color go to \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences, Appearance tab} and check on \texttt{Autocolor assets}. You will see this in the Flags section
432 as shown in Figure~\ref{fig:settings}.  It is disabled by default.  
433 Each media will have a random muted color and there could easily be close duplicates as generated by the program algorithm.  There will be no total black, but some dark shades are possible.  
434
435 To change a specific clip to your own chosen color, right mouse button (RMB) over that clip and an Edits popup will be displayed.  
436 Choose the option \textit{Bar Color} to bring up the color picker and choose a color.   
437 You can also change the alpha value in the color picker and this alpha takes precedence over the current alpha slider bar value unless the color picker's alpha value is set to 1.0.   
438 The color will only change after you click on the checkmark.  
439 The \emph{Bar Color} option works in either Drag and Drop or Cut and Paste editing mode and also works if \textit{Autocolor assets} is not set.  
440 In Drag and Drop editing mode, if you select several clips (reference "Create a 
441 group" in ~\ref{sub:grouping_edits}) and then bring up the Edits popup with the right mouse button over a track, you can use the \emph{Bar Color} option to change all of those selected to the same color.
442
443 To go back to the default colors, uncheck \textit{Autocolor assets} in Preferences, but this does not affect the specially chosen self-colored ones as they are preserved.  
444 To change these individually or selectively, use the Edits popup \emph{Bar Color} option and click on \textit{Default} in the color picker window.  
445
446 And that’s not all!  
447 There is an \emph{alpha fader slider bar} \index{alpha slider} on the bottom of the main window on the right hand side of the Zoom Panel.  
448 With this alpha slider, you can colorize your video and audio tracks to either see only the color at 0.0 or see only the image at 1.0.  
449 This slider bar affects all colored areas of the Autocolor assets and the self-colored ones.  
450 In the case when a specifically changed edit alpha value is set in the color picker
451 to any value except 1, the slider bar will not affect that.  
452 Once you use the slider bar, it is activated so gets first shot at any keystrokes in the main window.  
453 You deactivate this by simply clicking in a different part of the main window.  
454
455 As long as we are on the subject of color, just a note that you can also change the \textit{Highlighting Inversion color} in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences, Appearance tab}.  You can see this option in Figure~\ref{fig:settings} in the Color section.  
456 That setting defaults to white ($ffffff$) but sometimes this is a little bright so you can put any hex value in that suits you.
457
458 This image (figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}a) shows an example of the Autocolor assets with alpha set to 0.0 so that you see only the color and no image.
459 In this image (figure~\ref{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}b), the alpha is set to show the image
460 and waveforms with transluent colors.  The pink media file has been self-colored rather than the autocolor to make it easy to see.
461
462 \begin{figure}[htpb]
463     \centering
464     \begin{minipage}[h]{0.55\linewidth}
465         \center{\includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{autocolor-assets_alpha0.png}} \\ a)
466     \end{minipage}
467     \begin{minipage}[h]{0.4\linewidth}
468         \center{\includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{autocolor-assets_alpha1.png}} \\ b)
469     \end{minipage}
470     \caption{An example of the Autocolor assets}
471     \label{fig:autocolor_assets_alpha}
472 \end{figure}
473
474
475 \subsection{More about Pulldowns}%
476 \label{sub:more_about_pulldowns}
477
478 The main window pulldowns as pointed out in figure~\ref{fig:insertion-points} are quite obvious in their meaning and usage, so here is only a summary.  
479
480 %TODO Figure 3 shows an example of the pulldowns as displayed in the main window.Appearance
481
482
483 \begin{description}
484     \item[File] \index{file} options for loading, saving, and rendering as described in other sections (\ref{cha:load_save_and_the_EDL}).
485     \item[Edit] \index{edit} edit functions; most of which have shortcuts that you will quickly learn (\ref{cha:editing}).
486     \item[Keyframes] keyframe options which are described in the Keyframe section (\ref{cha:keyframes}).
487     \item[Audio] \index{audio} audio functions such as \textit{Add track}, \textit{Attach effect}
488 and \textit{Attach transition}.  The \textit{Attach effect} is especially useful when
489 you need the effect to be applied to all related audio tracks as a \textit{Shared effect}
490 and is described as an alternative method of application in section \ref{sec:shared_effect_tracks}.
491     \item[Video] \index{video} video functions such as \textit{Add track, Default/Attach transition, Render effect}.
492     \item[Tracks] \index{track} move or delete tracks are the most often used plus \textit{Align Timecodes}.
493     \item[Settings] \index{settings} much of this is described elsewhere with the most frequently used to include
494 Preferences (\ref{cha:configuration_settings_preferences}), Format (\ref{cha:project_and_media_attributes}), 
495 Proxy and Transcode (\ref{sec:proxy_settings}), as well as the others.
496     \item[View] \index{view} for display or modifying asset parameters and values to include Fade, Speed, and Cameras.
497     \item[Window] \index{window} window manipulation functions.
498 \end{description}
499
500
501 \subsection{Window Layouts}%
502 \label{sub:window_layouts}
503  \index{window!layout}
504
505 If you like to use different window layouts than the default for certain scenarios, you can setup, save, and load 4 variations.   
506 First, position your \CGG{} windows where you want them to be and then use the \textit{Window} pulldown and choose \emph{Save layout}. Note the words \emph{Save layout} highlighted in Figure~\ref{fig:window_layouts}a with 4 names shown to the right and below of that highlight. 
507 To use the default name of \textit{Layout \#}, when the popup comes up, just click the green checkmark OK on the Layout popup menu.  
508 If you would like a specific name for your layout so you can remember what its best use case is,
509 keyin 1-8 english characters that are meaningful to you (english characters mean you can not use the German umlaut, the French accent, or the Spanish ñ). 
510 Legal characters are a-z, A-Z, 0-9, \_ (the underscore character) and a limit of 8 total.  
511 If you keyin more than 8, only the last 8 characters will be used.  
512 To rename a currently existing layout, use the \emph{Save layout} option again on the one to rename, and keyin a different name into the text box or leave blank for the default name (figure~\ref{fig:window_layouts}b).
513
514 \begin{figure}[htpb]
515     \centering
516     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
517         \center{\includegraphics[width=1\linewidth]{window_layout1.png}}\\ a)
518         %TODO High res image replace
519     \end{minipage}
520     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
521 %begin{latexonly}
522         \vspace{13ex}
523 %end{latexonly}
524         \center{\includegraphics[width=1\linewidth]{window_layout2.png}}\\ b)
525         %TODO Alpha channel
526     \end{minipage}
527     \caption{Window Layouts}
528     \label{fig:window_layouts}
529 \end{figure}
530
531 The files containing the coordinates for your layouts will automatically be saved in the \texttt{\$HOME/.bcast5} directory as \texttt{layout\#\_rc} or \texttt{layout\#\_8chars\_rc}.
532
533 To use the desired layout, keyin the shortcut or use the \textit{Window} pulldown and choose \emph{Load layout} and then make your choice. It is very beneficial to 
534 learn the the associated shortcut layouts (Ctrl+Shift+Fx where x is 1,2,3, or 4)
535 because they can be executed from any of the 4 windows instead of just the main
536 timeline window.
537
538 \subsection{Multi-Pane Support}%
539 \label{sub:multipane_support}
540  \index{multi-pane}
541
542 The main \CGG{} edit window holds the Track Canvas which can be divided into 4 panes of track data: 1 or 2 vertical panes and/or 1 or 2 horizontal panes.  To split the track, use the \textit{Window} pulldown, and then click on \textit{Split X} or \textit{Split Y} depending on how you wish to split the track.  Alternatively, the canvas pane types can be changed using keys \textit{<Ctrl-1>} for toggle split horizontal or \textit{<Ctrl-2>} for toggle split vertical.  Or the track can be split into panes by using the \textit{+ widget} in the lower right hand corner of the track canvas.  Once the track has been divided, you can use the + widget shortcut or the drag bars to change the size of the panes.
543
544 Multi-Pane, or split screen, allows you to look at the first part of a movie at the same time as a part that is a long ways away on the timeline which would have been off the screen.  By having multiple panes, you can see the 2 parts you want to look at simultaneously and drag/drop easily between the 2.  Also, the \textit{X pane split} is extremely convenient for laptop users and computer monitors with small screens since it can be used with horizontal scrolling with the mouse wheel + Ctrl.  The \textit{Y-pane split} makes it easy to see 2 simultaneous drag and drop zones when you have lots of tracks (figure~\ref{fig:multi-pane01}).
545
546 \begin{figure}[htpb]
547         \centering
548         \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{multi-pane01.png}
549         \caption{Shown are 4 panes that have split in X and Y the main track canvas}
550         \label{fig:multi-pane01}
551 \end{figure}
552
553
554 \subsection{Just Playing!}%
555 \label{sub:just_playing_}
556 What if you are just using \CGG{} to play media and listen to tunes? 
557 After loading your media, just hit the space bar to start playing and then again to stop playing.  
558 Other than that, use the transport buttons on the top bar of the Program window.  
559 Other ways to \textit{play around} are described next. 
560
561 \subsubsection*{Repeat Play / Looping Method}%
562 \label{ssub:repeat_play_looping_method}
563  \index{transport buttons}
564
565 There are 2 methods for repeat play or looping on the timeline and 1 method for both the Compositor and the Viewer.  This works in conjunction with any of the transport buttons or shortcuts in either forward or reverse as usual.  The 1 exception is that the Shift key can not be used to either add or subtract audio within the repeat area.
566
567 \textit{Method 1:} Shift-L on the Timeline, repeats the selection per the algorithm outlined next.
568   
569 When setup, long green lines are displayed across the entire set of tracks which shows the start and end of the loop.
570 \begin{enumerate}
571     \item  Highlighted selection repeats loop and takes precedence over all other possibilities.  
572         If the cursor is before the highlighted area, it will play up to the area and then repeat the highlighted section.  
573         If the cursor is after the highlighted section, play will start at the beginning until you get to the
574         highlighted section and then repeat.
575     \item  When both In and Out pointers are set, it repeats the section between [ and ].
576     \item  If only one of the In or Out pointers is set, it loops the whole media.
577 \end{enumerate}
578
579 \textit{Method 2:} Ctrl+Shift+transport button on the Timeline, Viewer, and Compositor
580
581 \begin{enumerate}
582     \item Repeats entire media if no In or Out pointer set.
583     \item  In and Out pointer set, repeats area between pointers.
584     \item  Only In pointer set, repeats from In to end of media.
585 \end{enumerate}
586
587 \subsubsection*{Last Play Position Memory}%
588 \label{ssub:last_play_position_memory}
589
590
591 When you play media, the start/end playback positions are saved as if they had been made into temporary labels.  
592 They appear on the timeline as purple/yellow hairline markers representing the last start/end labels for the last playback. 
593 They can be addressed as if they are label markers using:
594
595 \begin{description}
596     \item[Ctrl$\leftarrow$]   tab to the label before the cursor, that is \textit{play start}
597     \item[Ctrl$\rightarrow$]   tab to the label after the cursor, that is \textit{play stop}
598 \end{description}
599
600
601 You can use these markers for re-selection.  
602 Additionally, the selection region can be expanded by \textit{pushing} the markers using single frame playback.  
603 Use frame reverse (\texttt{keypad 4}) to push the start play marker backward, or use frame forward (\texttt{keypad 1}) to push the end play marker forward.
604
605 Another handy feature is to use the combination of Ctrl-shift-arrow (left or right) to select the media from the cursor position (red hairline) to the start or end marker by \textit{tabbing} to the label markers.  
606 For example, tab to the beginning of the previous play region using Ctrl-left-arrow to move the cursor to the beginning of last play, then press Ctrl-Shift-right-arrow to tab to the end of the playback region. 
607 Now you can clip/play/expand or edit the previous playback selection.
608
609 \begin{description}
610     \item[Ctrl SHIFT$\rightarrow$]        tab cursor to label right of cursor position and expand selection
611     \item[Ctrl SHIFT$\leftarrow$]         tab cursor to label left of cursor position and expand selection
612 \end{description}
613
614
615 \subsubsection*{Playback Speed Automation Support}%
616 \label{ssub:playback_speed_automation_support}
617  \index{autos!speed}
618
619 The speed automation causes the playback sampling rate to increase or decrease to a period controlled by the speed automation curve.  
620 This can make playback speed-up or slow-down according to the scaled sampling rate, as \textit{time is multiplied by speed} (Speed $\times$ Unit\_rate). For more information on changing
621 the speed, read the section on Speed Automation~\ref{sec:speed_fade_automation_gang}.
622
623 \subsubsection*{Alternative to using Numeric Keypad for Playing}%
624 \label{ssub:alternative_to_using_numeric_keypad_for_playing}
625  \index{keypad}
626
627
628 For the keyboards without a numeric keypad or if you prefer to use keys closer to where you normally type, there are alternative keys for the play/transport functions.  These are listed below.
629
630 \begin{tabular}{lcl}
631         Alt + m&=&stop playback\\
632
633         Alt + j&=&forward single frame\\
634
635         Alt + k&=&forward slow playback\\
636
637         Alt + l&=&forward normal playback\\
638
639         Alt + ;&=&forward fast playback\\
640
641         Alt + u&=&reverse single frame\\
642
643         Alt + i&=&reverse slow playback\\
644
645         Alt + o&=&reverse normal playback\\
646
647         Alt + p&=&reverse fast playback\\
648 \end{tabular}
649 \begin{minipage}{.45\linewidth}
650 + Shift key, single frame forward/reverse will include audio; all others
651 will not include audio.
652 \vspace{1ex}
653
654 + Shift + Ctrl, results in the transport function operating only between the in/out pointers.
655 \end{minipage}
656
657 \section{Compositor Window}%
658 \label{sec:compositor_window}
659  \index{compositor!window}
660
661 \begin{figure}[htpb]
662     \centering
663     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{compositor_window.png}
664     \caption{Left hand side are the toolbar functions / bottom bar has many control functions}
665     \label{fig:compositor_window}
666 \end{figure}
667
668 The Compositor window (figure~\ref{fig:compositor_window}) is used to display the timeline
669 output.  Playing and moving along the timeline video in the Program window shows in the
670 Compositor window what the current image is.  Here is where many compositing operations are
671 performed that can change 
672 what the timeline will look like.  When enabled, you can simply click the LMB in the Compositor
673 window to start and stop play.
674   You can zoom in and out to 
675 see small details, pan with the scrollbars, lock the window to prevent changes, add masks,
676 and make changes with the Projector and Camera function operators. These will be explained
677 in more detail in the following sections.
678
679 \subsection{Compositor Controls}%
680 \label{sub:compositor_controls}
681 \index{compositor!controls}
682
683 On the bottom of the window, there are many
684 of the same transport buttons \index{transport buttons} and controls that are available in the Program window.
685 They work the same as in the Program window and also have tooltips that are visible 
686 when you mouse over each of the icons so their use is fairly obvious.  However,
687 of particular note is the button \textit{Click to play} \index{click to play} which is described in~\ref{sub:click_to_play_in_viewer_and_compositor}.  Next is the \textit{Videoscope} \index{videoscope} button which is used to enable the scopes window
688 without having to apply the filter to the tracks/edits.
689
690 Next to all of these controls all the way to the right side, there is a \textit{zoom menu} \index{zoom!menu} and a \textit{tally light}.  The \textit{zoom menu} has a pulldown with different settings that you can choose from
691 or you can just use the tumbler arrows to the right. Generally when just getting started, you
692 will be using the default \textit{Auto} option.  The window size is not changed, but rather
693 the size of the video itself. In addition there are many shortcuts for zooming that you
694 will find in the Shortcuts chapter (\ref{cha:shortcuts}).
695
696 Using a RMB click in the compositor window brings up a menu with several options \index{compositor!RMB options}.  One of these
697 is \emph{Resize Window} which allows for resizing the entire window instead of just the video
698 and if you highlight that, you can choose from several variations for the window size. 
699 Other available options include self-explanatory ones of \emph{Fullscreen} with "f" as a toggle
700 to go to fullscreen and to revert to non-fullscreen and \emph{Zoom Auto}. 
701 As you would expect, whenever the video is zoomed so that only part of the image is visible
702 in the window, scrollbars are automatically added as needed on the bottom, the right hand 
703 side, or both.
704 Other options include \emph{Reset camera} and \emph{Reset projector} which obviously are used
705 to reset the camera and the projector (reference~\ref{sub:camera_and_projector}).  And
706 \emph{Camera/Projector keyframe} will create a keyframe at that point on the timeline for
707 X,Y, and Z without the requirement of being in \textit{Automatic Keyframe Mode}.  More 
708 information is described in the section \nameref{sec:compositor_keyframes}.
709 The \emph{Hide controls/Show controls} option is great for hiding the left hand toolbar and
710 bottom set of controls for a cleaner look. 
711
712 Next to the zoom tumbler arrows, is a \textit{tally light} that will be filled in with some color
713 (often red or blue) when a rendering operation
714 is taking place \index{rendering!operation light}. This is especially helpful when loading a very large video so you know
715 when it is finished loading.  You should pay attention to this \textit{tally light} when performing
716 a particularly time-consuming operation so that you do not keep executing more operations
717 that just have to wait until completion of that CPU intensive operation.  Also, you should look
718 to see if the light is on before assuming that \CGG{} is hung up.
719
720 When the window is unlocked, meaning that it is not in \textit{Protect video from changes} mode on the
721 toolbar, MMB clicking and dragging anywhere in the video pans the view.  Panning can also
722 be accomplished with the bottom and right hand side scroll bars when displayed.
723
724 \subsection{Compositor Toolbar}%
725 \label{sub:compositor_toolbar}
726 \index{compositor!toolbar}
727
728 On the left hand side of the Compositor window, there is a toolbar with several icons that
729 provide functions for viewing and compositing the video. Each of these operational features 
730 will be described in more detail next. 
731 \begin{description}
732     \item[Protect video from changes] this option makes it possible to disable changes to the
733 compositor output when clicking on the Compositor window. It allows for using the
734 \textit{Click to play} button (when enabled) for simply starting and stopping play.  It helps
735 to prevent an accidental click from making unwanted changes. When you enable this option, any
736 of the other enabled tools will automatically be disabled.
737
738      \item[Zoom view / magnifying glass] \index{zoom!slider} when enabled, the \textit{Zoom view} immediately results
739 in the addition of a zoom slider for fine viewing.  
740 The vertically oriented \textit{zoom slider} will be displayed underneath the last icon of the toolbar and extends
741 to almost the end of the toolbar.
742 The slider allows for adjusting the amount of zoom at any level between 0.01 and 100 based on a logarithmic scale.  
743
744 When using the zoom slider, the number by which the view is zoomed can be seen in the textbox 
745 on the bottom controls where the \% zoom is located.  
746 The zoom slider size is in the form of \textit{times}, such as $\times$0.82 which indicates that the picture is zoomed to $\frac{82}{100}^{th}$ of the original size as seen in the \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Format} menu.  
747 Once you have set the zoom to the desired size, use the vertical and horizontal scroll bars to position the view as needed.
748 As mentioned earlier, this
749 variety of zoom only affects the video and not the resizing of the Compositor window.  After
750 utilizing this slider bar for zooming around, you may want to switch back to \textit{Auto} 
751 using the controls on the bottom of the window.
752 This slider bar is also displayed
753 when you click on the icons for \textit{Adjust camera automation} or \textit{Adjust projector automation}.  
754
755 The Compositor window image in figure~\ref{fig:zoom_slider} shows the zoom slider bar with rectangular shaped slider about in the middle.  Note that the magnifying glass is enabled which
756 automatically pops-up the slider and the \textit{Protect video from changes} is disabled.  Also note that
757 there is a scroll bar on the bottom and right side of the image since the image at this magnification
758 does not fit in the window.
759 The Controls zoom textbox shows $\times0.82$ size.  
760 \end{description}
761
762 \begin{figure}[htpb]
763     \centering
764     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{zoom_slider.png}
765     \caption{Compositor window zoom slider bar and scroll bars}
766     \label{fig:zoom_slider}
767 \end{figure}
768 \begin{description}
769     \item[Edit mask] \index{mask} brings up a mask editing menu with many versatile options as
770 described in great detail later in this section (\ref{sub:masks}). You may also have to click on
771 \textit{Show tool info} to popup the menu depending on whether or not you dismissed that window previously.
772     \item[Ruler] \index{ruler} this can be a handy tool to get the X,Y coordinates of an exact point or to 
773 measure the distance between 2 points. To use the \textit{Ruler}, move the mouse on the video to
774 get to the desired spot - these X,Y coordinates will be displayed in the \textit{Current} text
775 box.  Clicking the LMB creates Point 1 and then continue to hold down the LMB so that a ruler line is created between
776 this Point 1 and the stopping Point 2.  \textit{Deltas} is the X,Y difference between the 2 points;
777 \textit{Distance} is the number of pixels between the 2 points; and \textit{Angle} is the angle in degrees of the ruler line.  
778 In Figure~\ref{fig:safe_regions} you can see the Ruler menu on the right side of the Compositor window.
779
780 Holding down the Ctrl key while dragging with the LMB on one of the points, will
781 ensure that the line is always at a multiple of a 45 degree angle.  Holding down the Alt key while
782 dragging with the LMB on any of the points, will translate the ruler line to another place on 
783 the video while maintaining its length and angle. For some desktop window managers, such as 
784 \textit{UbuntuStudio 16.4} and \textit{Arch}, the Alt key is already in use by the Operating System
785 so you will have to use Alt+Ctrl instead.
786 If you dismiss the Ruler menu, click on
787 \textit{Show tool info} to get the menu to popup again.  
788     \item[Adjust camera automation] \index{camera} the camera brings up the camera editing tool. Enable \textit{Show tool info} if the popup menu does not appear. More detail for usage is provided in the subsequent
789 section~\ref{sub:camera_and_projector}.
790     \item[Adjust projector automation] \index{projector} the projector brings up the projector editing tool. Enable \textit{Show tool info} to get the menu to popup again. More detail for usage is provided in the
791 subsequent section~\ref{sub:camera_and_projector}.
792     \item[Crop a layer or output] \index{crop} this is a cropping tool used to reduce the visible picture area.
793 More detail for usage is provided in a 
794 subsequent paragraph (\ref{sub:cropping}).  There is also a Crop \& Position plugin that provides
795 a different set of capabilities described in~\ref{sub:crop_position}.
796     Enable \textit{Show tool info} to get the menu to popup if it does not come
797 up automatically.
798     \item[Get color / eyedropper] \index{eyedropper} brings up the eyedropper used to detect the color at a
799 particular spot.  Enable the \textit{Show tool info} if the Color popup menu does not come up 
800 automatically or if that menu was accidentally dismissed.  Click on a specific color in the video
801 output with the LMB to see the selected color. You can then use that color's 
802 value to be applied to some effects depending on how the effect handles the eyedropper.  If you set the \textit{Radius} to a larger number, a square appears
803 around the cross cursor and an average value of the color will be the result.
804 If you \textit{Use maximum}, instead of an average value of the color, the result
805 will be the maximum of all values within that square.
806     \item[Show tool info] \index{tool info} this tool button is used in conjunction with the other tools on the
807 compositor's toolbar. You only need to click on this if one of these tools popup menu does not
808 come up or has been dismissed - Mask, Ruler, Camera, Projector, Crop, or Eyedropper tools.
809 You can also use it when highlighted to dismiss the highlighted tool's dialog box.
810 It is not needed for \textit{Protect video from changes}, \textit{Zoom view}, and \textit{Show safe regions} since they have
811 no dialog popup menus.
812
813 \begin{figure}[htpb]
814     \centering
815     \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{safe_regions.png}
816     \caption{Note the black outlines showing the safe regions. Also note the Ruler menu}
817     \label{fig:safe_regions}
818 \end{figure}
819
820     \item[Show safe regions] \index{safe region} draws 2 outlines to display the safe regions in the video as you
821 can see in Figure~\ref{fig:safe_regions}.
822 On some particular TVs/monitors/displays, the borders of the image are cut off and that
823 cut off section might not be as square as it appears in the compositor window. 
824 These are especially useful if the device for the output display is an older model TV\@.
825 The outside largest outline is the \textit{action safe overlay}; whereas the inside smallest
826 outline is the \textit{title safe overlay}.
827
828 Using the \textit{Show safe regions} has no affect on the rendered output.
829 The purpose of showing the borders is to make it easy to see where it might be cut off.  This
830 area outside the safe region can then be used as
831 a scratch or vertical blanking space.  Enabling the safe regions makes it really
832 easy to see these borders so that you can make sure 
833 titles are inside the inner outline and actions are inside the outer outline.
834
835 \end{description}
836
837 \subsection{Compositing}%
838 \label{sub:compositing}
839 \index{compositing}
840
841 Much of the editing in \CGG{} involves \textit{compositing} which is the combining of visual
842 elements from different sources into single images.  This includes such things as 
843 speeding up and slowing down the video, changing the resolution, creating a split screen, and fading in and out.
844 Compositing operations are done on the timeline and in the Compositor window using various
845 operations and other compositing attributes that are available in the Resources window.
846 When \CGG{} is performing a compositing operation it plays back through the
847 compositing engine, but when not, it uses the fastest decoder that it has.
848
849 \subsection{The Temporary, Track and Output Sizes}%
850 \label{sub:track_and_output_sizes}
851
852 This section explains a few things which help to understand Compositing - especially with relation
853 to the camera, effects, and the projector.
854
855 \subsubsection*{The Temporary}%
856 \label{ssub:output_size}
857 \index{temporary}
858
859 \CGG{}'s compositing routines use a \textit{temporary} which is a single frame of video in
860 memory where graphics processing takes place. The size of the temporary and of the output in
861 the compositing pipeline are different and vary for any particular frame.  Effects are processed in
862 the temporary and as such are affected by the temporary size.  In the case of the camera, its
863 viewport is the temporary size. However, projectors are rendered to the output and so are affected
864 by the output size. When the temporary is smaller than the output, the temporary will have blank
865 borders around the region in the output.  When the temporary is larger than the output, it will be
866 cropped.
867
868 \subsubsection*{Track and Output size}%
869 \label{ssub:track_size}
870 \index{track!size}
871 \index{output size}
872
873 The \textit{Track size} is used to define the temporary size with each track having a different size (viewports). It also serves to conform the input media to a chosen format (aspect ratio). So each track can have a different format (viewport).
874 You can see or set the track size by RMB click on a track and then select \emph{Resize Track} to resize
875 the track to any size. Or select \emph{Match output size} to make the track the same size as the
876 output. Or from the Resources window, RMB on a video media and choose \textit{Info} and then \textit{Resize}. When a track is resized then what it looks like on the compositor changes.  The relationship
877 between the track and the project's output size makes it possible to magnify or reduce the size of
878 a track in regards to the final output. This feature means you can create visual effects such as different aspect ratios, adjust split screens, zooms, and pans in the compositor.
879
880 The \textit{Output size} can be set in \texttt{File $\rightarrow$ New} when creating a new project,
881 or by using \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Format}, or in the Resources window with RMB click on
882 a video asset and choosing \texttt{Match $\rightarrow$ Match project size}. When you \emph{Match project size}, you
883 are conforming the output to the asset. To change the size and aspect ratio of the output (Projector) we have to change the whole project, which will alter all the tracks in the timeline. Once you have set the output size in 1 of these 3 ways,
884 any newly created tracks will conform to the specified output size.  When rendering, the project's
885 output size is the final video track size where the temporary pipeline is rendered into. 
886
887 \subsubsection*{Aspect Ratio (Theory)}%
888 \label{ssub:aspect_ratio_theory}
889 \index{aspect ratio}
890 \index{PAR, DAR, SAR}
891
892 The aspect ratio is the ratio of the sides of the frame (\textit{Width} and \textit{Height}). For example, classically broadcast TV was 4:3 (= 1.33), whereas today it has changed to 16:9 (= 1.85); in cinema we use the 35 mm aspect ratio of 1.37 (Academic aperture), but even more so the super 35 mm (2.35). There are also anamorphic formats, i.e. that have no square pixels, like Cinemascope (2.35). The projection must be \textit{normalized} to have an undistorted view.
893
894
895 From the film or digital sensors of the cameras, we can extract any frame size we want. We are talking about \textit{viewports}, which we will examine shortly. Also important is the output of the film that will be rendered, because it is what we will see at the cinema, or on TV, or on the monitor of the PC, tablet or smartphone. Referring to figure~\ref{fig:temporary-01}, you can see these two possibilities: with the Camera you choose the size and aspect ratio of the source file (regardless of the original size); while with the Projector you choose the size and aspect ratio of the output.
896
897 The following formula is used to vary the aspect ratio:
898
899 \qquad $\frac{W}{H} =$ aspect ratio ($\frac{pixels}{pixels}$)
900
901 For example to obtain an aspect ratio of Super 35 mmm (2.35) starting from a FullHD file (1920x1080) whose base extension (1920) we want to keep:
902
903 \qquad $\frac{1920}{H} = 2.35$
904
905 from which: $H = 817$ pixels
906
907 \CGG{} allows you to vary the input and output aspect ratio in the ways indicated in the previous section: by varying the pixels of the sides or by setting a multiplication coefficient.
908
909 In \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Format} there is the additional possibility to vary the shape of the pixels from 1:1 (square) to handle anamorphic formats. In such cases we use:
910
911 \qquad $PAR=\frac{DAR}{SAR}$
912
913 where:
914
915 \textit{DAR}= Display Aspect Ratio
916
917 \textit{PAR}= Pixel Aspect Ratio (1 or 1:1 is square)
918
919 \textit{SAR}= Storage Aspect Ratio (i.e media file aspect ratio)
920
921
922 \subsection{Camera and Projector}%
923 \label{sub:camera_and_projector}
924 \index{camera}
925 \index{projector}
926
927 In the compositor window, \textit{Adjust camera automation} and \textit{Adjust projector automation}
928 are editing tools to control operation of the camera and projector.  In \CGG{}'s compositing
929 pipeline, the camera determines where in the source the \textit{temporary} is copied from while
930 the projector determines where in the output the \textit{temporary} is copied to
931 (figure~\ref{fig:temporary-01}). 
932
933 \begin{figure}[htpb]
934     \centering
935     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{temporary-01.pdf}
936     \caption{Compositing pipeline}
937     \label{fig:temporary-01}
938 \end{figure}
939
940 In compositing, each frame can be changed using various options and plugins, such as
941 a color correction plugin (figure~\ref{fig:camera_and_projector}).  After the image has been
942 modified, the final image is projected to the compositor so that you now have a changed original.
943
944 \begin{figure}[htpb]
945     \centering
946     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{camera_and_projector.pdf}
947     \caption{Color3way on Temporary}
948     \label{fig:camera_and_projector}
949 \end{figure}
950
951 When editing the camera and projector in the compositing window, the affected track will be the
952 first track that is armed.  If there are multiple video tracks, you can select one specific track
953 for editing with a LMB click on the \textit{Arm track} icon of the desired track. This is called
954 "solo" the track. To reverse this solo-ing, LMB click on the icon again. 
955
956 \subsubsection*{Projector Compositing}%
957 \label{ssub:projector_compositing}
958 \index{projector}
959
960 The purpose of the \textit{projector} is to composite several sources from various tracks into one
961 output track.  The projector alignment frame is the same as the camera's viewport, except that it
962 shows where to put the contents of each temporary on the output canvas.  To get into projector
963 editing mode, click on the \textit{Adjust projector automation} icon in the Compositor toolbar. You
964 will then see red border lines surrounding the image and 2 diagonal lines criss-crossing in the 
965 middle, displayed in the video window.  The red outline indicates the size of the frame that will be
966 sent to the Output. You can easily drag the box with LMB, moving the frame in $x$ and $y$ directions.
967 When moving along the $z-axis$ (i.e.\ the zoom, with SHIFT+Drag) the box exactly follows the movement
968 and the size of the frame. After you position the video with the projector, you may next want to
969 \textit{Adjust camera automation}.
970
971 \subsubsection*{The Viewport}%
972 \label{ssub:viewport}
973 \index{viewport}
974
975 The \textit{viewport} is a window on the camera that frames the area of source video. The size of the current track is used for the initial size of the viewport. A smaller viewport, for example ($640\times480$), captures a smaller area; whereas a larger viewport of ($800\times600$) captures a larger area.  If the captured area is larger than the source video, the empty spaces will be automatically filled with blanks.  To change the size and aspect ratio of the viewport (Camera \index{camera}) of a single track, right-click on the track in the timeline and choose Resize Track. Here we can vary the height and base of the viewport in pixels or choose the multiplication coefficient for each side (Scale). With OK we will see the change in the Compositor window with the new dimensions reflected in the green box. We can have different size viewports for each video track on the timeline. To go back, reset the viewport to the original value. After the viewport is defined, the camera needs to be placed right above the area of interest in the source video. Operations to control the location of the camera are as follows:
976
977 \begin{enumerate}
978     \item  In the compositor window you should see the selected track.
979     \item  LMB click on the \textit{Adjust camera automation} to bring up the editing menu and the 
980 green and yellow colored outlines.
981     \item  Use the LMB to drag the video over the display in the compositor window to the desired
982 placement.
983 \end{enumerate}
984
985 When you drag over the viewport in the compositor window, it looks like you are moving the camera
986 with the mouse.  The viewport moves in the same manner.
987
988 \subsubsection*{Camera Compositing}%
989 \label{ssub:camera_compositing}
990 \index{camera}
991
992 Select the camera button to enable camera editing mode. 
993 In this mode, the guide box shows where the camera position is in relation to past and future camera positions but not where it is in relation to the source video. 
994 The green box is the Viewport; at the beginning it coincides with the size of the source frame. If we move the viewport by dragging it with LMB (moving it in $x/y$), the green box remains fixed to the original size but the frame is moved to the new position.  A yellow frame will appear along the edges of the frame to indicate the displacement with respect to the green box; this behavior differs from that seen for the Projector. Even if we act on the $z-axis$ (SHIFT + Drag, equivalent to the zoom), the frame narrows or widens, moving behind the yellow frame.
995
996 \subsubsection*{Camera and Projector Menu}%
997 \label{ssub:camera_and_projector_menu}
998 \index{tool info}
999 \index{camera}
1000 \index{projector}
1001
1002 The camera and projector have shortcut operations that do not appear in the popup menu and are not represented in video overlays. 
1003 These are accessed in the \emph{Show tool info} window.
1004 Most operations in the Compositor window have a tool window which is enabled by activating the question mark icon (figure~\ref{fig:camera_tool}).
1005
1006 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1007         \centering
1008         \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{camera_tool.png}
1009         \caption{Camera and Projector tool}
1010         \label{fig:camera_tool}
1011 \end{figure}
1012
1013 In the \textit{Position} section you can act on the $X$, $Y$ and $Z$ coordinates. By either tumbling or entering text directly or by using the slider, the camera and projector can be precisely positioned. There is also a reference to the color of the curve as we see it on the timeline. You can also define the \textit{range} of action which by default is [-100 to 100]. By pressing the Reset button for each coordinate, or the global Reset button, the range is automatically brought to the project size value (HD; 4k; etc), which are usually the most useful limits. Note that the range can also be changed in the \textit{Program} window, in the \textit{zoom bar}, where there are similar input fields to enter the chosen limits.
1014
1015 In the \textit{Justify} section we can use automatic positioning in the 6 standard coordinates: Left, Horizontal, Right, Top, Center and Bottom.
1016
1017 The translation effect allows simultaneous aspect ratio conversion and reduction but is easier to use if the reduced video is put in the upper left of the \textit{temporary} instead of in the center. 
1018 The track size is set to the original size of the video and the camera is centered. 
1019 The output size is set to the reduced size of the video. 
1020 Without any effects, this produces just the cropped center portion of the video in the output.
1021
1022 The translation effect is dropped onto the video track. The input dimensions of the translation effect are set to the original size and the output dimensions are set to the reduced size. 
1023 To put the reduced video in the center subsection that the projector shows would require offsetting out $X$ and out $Y$ by a complicated calculation. 
1024 Instead, we leave out $X$ and out $Y$ at 0 and use the projector's tool window. 
1025 By selecting left justify and top justify, the projector displays the reduced image from the top left corner of the \textit{temporary} in the center of the output.
1026
1027 In the \textit{Curve type} section we can choose between various interpolation algorithms that determine the curve type \index{curve type}:
1028
1029 \begin{description}
1030         \item[smooth:] bezier interpolation which are flat at the endpts
1031         \item[linear:] piecewise linear curve.
1032         \item[tangent:] bezier interpolation with collinear endpts in a specified line.
1033         \item[free:] piecewise bezier, if there is such a thing.
1034         \item[bump:] has 2 values, one viewed from the left/right, discontinuous.
1035 \end{description}
1036
1037 In the \textit{Keyframe} section we can create new keyframes and set them as Bump autos (\textit{Right/Left edges} and \textit{Span} buttons). For further details see \nameref{sec:bump_autos}.
1038
1039 \subsubsection*{Reset to Default}%
1040 \label{ssub:reset_default}
1041
1042 In the compositing window, there is a popup menu of options for the camera and projector. Right click over the video portion of the compositing window to bring up the menu:
1043
1044 \textit{Reset Camera}: causes the camera to return to the center position.
1045         
1046 \textit{Reset Projector}: causes the projector to return to the center.
1047
1048 \subsubsection*{Use Case: Interaction Between Camera And Projector \protect\footnote{Example provided by Sam. The relative video is located at: \url{https://streamable.com/iq08i}}}%
1049 \label{ssub:use_case_interaction_camera_projector}
1050 \index{camera}
1051 \index{projector}
1052
1053 \begin{enumerate}
1054     \item Start by shrinking the projector to $z=0.500$ ($\frac{1}{4}$ of the original frame).
1055     \item The next step is to switch to the camera and note that the green box has assumed the size of the projector, i.e.\ the red box. The value of $z$ of the camera is always equal to $1.000$ (default) but the frame is $\frac{1}{4}$ of the original frame, i.e.\ it has the size of the projector that has $z=0.500$. This is the current viewport size.
1056     \item You enlarge the room bringing $z=2.000$. You can see that the dimensions of the viewport (green box) do not change, remaining the same as those of the projector. However, the frame has been enlarged and this variation is indicated by the enlargement of the yellow box. Let's remember that this follows the changes made with the camera tool.
1057     \item We can drag the room so that we can center the frame to our liking. The movement of the yellow box shows well the variation compared to the green box.
1058     \item Finally, if we want, we can switch to the projector tool to move the output frame to the position we want with respect to the size of the source. Of course, we can also work on the $z$, which in the example is at $z=0.500$, if we have decided to change the size of the output.
1059 \end{enumerate}
1060
1061 \subsection{Masks}%
1062 \label{sub:masks}
1063 \index{mask}
1064
1065 Masks can be used to accomplish various tasks but basically are used to select an area of the 
1066 video to be displayed or hidden. 
1067 They can be used in conjunction with another effect to isolate the effect to a certain region.
1068 Another usage is where you slightly delay one video track copy and unmask an area where
1069 the one copy has interference but the other copy does not.  Or use a mask when  color correction is
1070 needed in one part of a frame but not another.  A mask can be applied to just a small section of
1071 a color corrected track while a plain track shows through. 
1072 Removal of boom microphones, license plates, people and airplanes via mask is a very common usage.
1073
1074 The order of the compositing pipeline affects how masks are done. Usually masks are operated on the
1075 temporary, after the effects but before the projector. Because of the way this works, multiple
1076 tracks can be bounced to a masked track and projected with the same mask.
1077
1078 The compositing pipeline graph has a masking stage (figure~\ref{fig:temporary-02}).
1079
1080 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1081     \centering
1082     \includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{temporary-02.pdf}
1083     \caption{Compositing pipeline with mask}
1084     \label{fig:temporary-02}
1085 \end{figure}
1086
1087 \subsubsection*{Compositing pipeline with masks}%
1088 \label{ssub:compositing_pipeline_with_masks}
1089 \index{compositing pipeline}
1090
1091 The Mask popup menu can be overwhelming upon first encounter.  However, if you follow the next
1092 few steps you can create a single simple mask without having to understand every possible parameter.
1093 \begin{enumerate}
1094     \item To define a mask, in the Compositor window click on the \textit{Edit mask} icon to get the popup Mask menu.  If the menu does not come up, click on the \textit{Show tool info}.
1095     \item  On the video, LMB click on the place where you want to start a mask.
1096     \item  Then LMB click on another spot of the image to create each new point of the mask. Once
1097 you have at least 3 points, lines will be drawn between them, but you can just create as many
1098 more points as you need and the lines will be redrawn to cover all points. When you 
1099 create each point of the mask a straight line curve is expanded, altering the shape of the mask.
1100 The mask position will always be in the same position on each image of the video unless you enable 
1101 \textit{Generate keyframes while tweaking} on the Program window Transport and Buttons bar. Then when 
1102 enabled you can move a mask over time.
1103      \item For a mask to be seen or not seen, there must be another video track under the track
1104 that you are viewing in the compositor.  An easy way to see the masked area is to just add an empty track
1105 below the target track and drag the \textit{Gradient} plugin to a highlighted area on that track.
1106      \item  You can move existing points to new locations by simply using the LMB at a point to
1107 drag that point to a different location.
1108     \item  The mask can be translated as a single entity by Alt-dragging the mask.  For some desktop
1109 window managers, such as \textit{UbuntuStudio 16.4} and \textit{Arch}, the Alt key is already in use
1110 by the Operating System so you will have to use Alt+Ctrl instead.
1111     \item To create curved instead of straight lines between the points, use  Ctrl-drag on a
1112 specific point. Using Ctrl-drag activates bezier handles (control points) to create these curves
1113 between the points. For example, on a mask with just two points, you can create a romantic heart mask.     
1114 \end{enumerate}
1115
1116 There are a lot more operations you can do using the Mask menu as shown in 
1117 figure~\ref{fig:mask_window}.  Detailed description is provided here next.  Note that the Mask
1118 window is separated into various sections to make it easier to locate the area of interest.
1119
1120 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1121     \centering
1122     \includegraphics[width=0.5\linewidth]{mask_window.png}
1123     \caption{Mask options window}
1124     \label{fig:mask_window}
1125 \end{figure}
1126
1127 \subsubsection*{Masks on Track section}%
1128 \label{ssub:masks_track_section}
1129
1130 The \textit{Track}: textbox displays the different video tracks for your session which will be initially set to the first armed video track or will be left blank if there are no armed tracks.  A pulldown to the right of the box brings up the names of all of the video tracks allowing you to change to which track the masking applies.  You can also just use the tumbler to easily mouse up/down to get to the desired track. In the pulldown list, any track that has a red colored text name is disarmed so that you can not change it.  A track that contains masks has yellow colored text for easy identification.  Only when there are no masks on the track, do you have the default text color. This textbox is display only and you can not type into it.
1131
1132 The \textit{Solo} button in the Masks on Track section of the Mask window is very handy when working with masks on different tracks.  It displays just that track so that you see only the track you choose, as well as the tracks behind it to show the mask part.  The Solo button is just a convenience to prevent having to mouse over to the patchbay.
1133
1134 \subsubsection*{Masks section}%
1135 \label{ssub:masks_section}
1136
1137 The \textit{Mask}: textbox will show you the mask numbers of $0-7$ or the 8 ascii character name that you have used to designate each mask number.  There is a pulldown on the right side to easily switch to another mask. 
1138
1139 The \textit{Delete} button is used to delete the mask number/name that is selected. The symbol to the right with tooltip of \textit{Delete all masks} can be used to delete all of the current video track masks.
1140
1141 The \textit{Select}: row of checkboxes is used to indicate which mask is currently displayed for that video track in the Compositor.  Numbers that are colored yellow are active masks for that track.  A tumbler to the right allows for quickly changing the mask number displayed.
1142
1143 The \textit{Enable} row of masks makes it so you can enable all or none of the masks, making it possible to look at no masks or at one mask without interference from the other masks. The symbol that looks like an \texttt{eye} can be used to easily check all or none as the tooltip \textit{Show/Hide mask states}.
1144
1145 \subsubsection*{Preset Shapes section}%
1146 \label{ssub:preset_shape_section}
1147
1148 There are 4 shapes that are automatically available for usage as masks – square, circle, triangle, and oval.  In addition, the next 3 symbols in this section are for the purpose of loading, saving, and deleting your own customized shapes.  The first symbol, \textit{Load} preset, will bring up a list of your previously saved presets.  Clicking on \textit{Save} preset brings up a popup window allowing you to provide a name used to identify the preset you want to save, along with a pulldown to see the names of your other saved presets.   Clicking on \textit{Delete} preset also brings up a textbox with a pulldown to choose which one to delete.  There is a file, called \texttt{mask\_rc}, in \texttt{\$HOME/.bcast5} that records your custom masks.  
1149
1150 When you click \textit{Load} preset, keep in mind that it will write the mask number that you have selected so if you already have a mask at that location, it will write over it – just \textit{Undo mask} under the main window \textit{Edit} pulldown (shortcut `z'or `Ctrl-z') to revert to the previous if you made this mistake.
1151
1152 \subsubsection*{Position \& Scale section}%
1153 \label{ssub:position_scale_section}
1154
1155 \textit{Center} mask button allows for quickly centering a mask on the video track. 
1156 \textit{Normalize} mask button makes it easy to normalize the size of the mask based on the scale of the video - about 1/4 the window size in the X and Y 
1157 directions.  Normalization makes the mask fit in the space to avoid having
1158 it wander off of the window, then you can move it around easily before resizing.
1159 The next 3 symbols concern the direction to \textit{drag translate} a mask using the \texttt{Alt+LMB} thus making it easy to preserve the current $X$ or $Y$ value when desirable.  For some desktop window managers,
1160 such as \textit{UbuntuStudio 16.4} and \textit{Arch}, the Alt key is already in use by the Operating System
1161 so you will have to use Alt+Ctrl instead.
1162
1163 \texttt{xlate/scale x}  - drag translate constrained in the $X$ direction
1164
1165 \texttt{xlate/scale y}  - drag translate constrained in the $Y$ direction
1166
1167 \texttt{xlate/scale x/y}        - drag translate in both directions; this is the default and after using the other 2 options, you should reset to this to avoid future confusion while dragging.
1168
1169 \subsubsection*{Fade \& Feather section}%
1170 \label{ssub:fade_feather_section}
1171
1172 The \texttt{Fade}: textbox is used to type in a fade value; the tumbler to the right of the textbox allows you to increase or decrease that number; and the slider bar makes it quick to adjust the fade value.  The fader goes from $-100$ on the left to $+100$ on the right for negative to positive.  Default value is $+100$. The fade slider includes a sticky point at 0 so that it is easy to get to 0 without going too far or not quite far enough -- that way you don’t have to keep jiggling to get there. 
1173
1174 In addition there is a \textit{Gang fader} symbol to allow for having all of the masks fade in unison. The symbol is surrounded by a green colored background \protect\footnote{green is used in the default Cakewalk theme, but the background color will be different in other themes} when it is in effect.  If you have multiple masks with different modes, a decision had to be made on what value to use -- it uses the maximum transparency value of the background to determine the operations results.  To understand how this works, here is a summary:
1175
1176 Note1: The area outside the mask is referred to as the background.
1177
1178 Note2: The operational result is based on the maximum transparency value of that background.
1179
1180 \paragraph{Case 1, Positive Fade:} When the fade for all of the masks is positive, affecting the area inside of the mask, all of the
1181 background colors are at a transparency value of zero. So the largest transparency value is 0,and all masks are drawn with opaque backgrounds, depicted as one would expect.
1182
1183 \paragraph{Case 2, Negative Fade:} When the program computes the background color for any number of masks that includes negative
1184 mask(s), it uses the largest transparency number as the determining factor for the background. Only 1 of the masks can be largest, and wins for the background transparency result.
1185
1186 \vspace{3ex}\textit{Feather}: works in a similar manner to a \textit{gradient Fade} aligned on the mask boundary but is a logical function instead of a mathematical function so will be faster.  The \textit{Gang feather} symbol also works in a similar fashion and is surrounded by a colored background when it is in effect.
1187
1188 \subsubsection*{Mask Points section}%
1189 \label{ssub:masks_points_section}
1190
1191 This section is used to change to a different mask number and manipulate the masks you have created.
1192
1193 The \textit{Point}: textbox provides the ability to change which point number for the current mask that you want to work on.  It has a tumbler to allow for quickly switching the point number.  The \textit{X:} and \textit{Y:} boxes below reflect the current values and allow for modifying the $X/Y$ coordinates and these too have tumblers. The \textit{Delete} button will allow for deleting the selected point number.
1194
1195 The next 6 symbols in 2 columns represent \textit{Smooth} and \textit{Linear} buttons.  Smooth buttons use an algorithm based on the previous point and the next point to create a curved line. The smoothing operation takes three points, A, B, C, and arranges the slope at B to be AC as it moves to the next point for that mask.
1196
1197 \textit{smooth point}   $\rightarrow$ smooth a single point.
1198
1199 \textit{smooth curve}   $\rightarrow$ smooth all points on a mask edge curve.
1200
1201 \textit{smooth all}     $\rightarrow$ smooth all enabled masks on this track.
1202
1203 Linear buttons of \textit{linear point}, \textit{linear curve}, and \textit{linear all}, perform the inverse of the smooth functions.
1204 The control point vectors on the bezier endpoints are set to zero magnitude.
1205
1206 In addition there is a \textit{Markers} and a \textit{Boundary} checkbox which come in handy to turn off the display of the points and the outline of the mask.  Turning off \textit{Markers} is very useful when you have a lot of control points that clutter the display and make it more difficult to see the actual mask.  A helpful feature is available by disabling \textit{Markers} and enabling \textit{Boundary} which results in all masks being displayed in the viewer
1207 even if they are not enabled; for example you can then see mask 0, mask 1 \dots at the same time.
1208
1209 A \textit{gang} symbol on the right hand side of this section, tooltip of \textit{Gang points}, is another useful feature that makes it easy to drag a mask to an exact coordinate using the \textit{X} or \textit{Y} textbox for numerical input or the associated tumblers.  This works like the \texttt{Alt+LMB drag} translate but provides the ability to be precise.
1210
1211 \subsubsection*{Pivot Point section}%
1212 \label{ssub:pivot_point_section}
1213
1214 The \textit{X:} and \textit{Y:} coordinates mark the value of the current \textit{Pivot Point} used for rotation, scaling, and translation.  You can either directly key in numerical values or use the tumblers to change the values as long as the \textit{Focus} checkbox is checked.
1215
1216 The \textit{Focus} checkbox is used in case you want to set a different point in the Compositor for pivoting instead.  And the \textit{Gang} symbol for rotate/scale/translate means that these operations will be performed on all points of the enabled masks.  The gang symbol is surrounded by a colored background when it is in effect.  When performing a rotate operation on a mask with the mouse wheel, \textit{acceleration} is in effect -- this means the faster you wheel, the more space is covered so that you do not have to wheel dozens of time to make a full rotation.  Then when you wheel around slower, you can fine tune the result.
1217 Note that in order to be able to rotate/scale around pointer, the Focus checkbox must be unchecked.
1218
1219 \subsubsection*{Other sections}%
1220 \label{ssub:other_sections}
1221
1222 Finally there are the \textit{Apply masks before plugins} and \textit{Disable OpenGL masking} self-explanatory checkboxes.
1223
1224 Note: Not all OpenGL software can support the current masking methods.  If your opengl implementation does not support Shader Version 4.3 or has trouble with this (it is relatively new to opengl at the time this was implemented), then this checkbox will allow you to use the software masking to avoid any potential issues.  Normally, OpenGL is probed for the shader version and will automatically use the software implementation if required.
1225
1226 The \textit{Help} checkbox can be enabled in order to see a list of the keys used to perform various operations.  If you use Masking infrequently, these are a valuable reminder to which key combinations to use.  Currently they are as follows:
1227
1228 \vspace{2ex}
1229 \begin{tabular}{ll}
1230     \hline                      
1231     Shift+LMB & move an end point \\
1232     Ctrl+LMB & move a control point \\
1233     Alt+LMB & to drag translate the mask \\
1234     Shift+MMB & set Pivot Point at pointer \\
1235     Wheel & rotate around Pivot Point \\
1236     Shift+Wheel & scale around Pivot Point \\
1237     Ctrl+Wheel & rotate/scale around pointer \\
1238     \hline  
1239 \end{tabular}
1240
1241 \subsubsection*{Key Alternatives}%
1242 \label{ssub:key_alternatives}
1243
1244 \vspace{2ex} Note: For some desktop window managers, certain keys may already be in use by the operating system, so you will either have to redefine them in your desktop or use different key combinations.  For example, at least some desktops used with \textit{UbuntuStudio 16.04} and \textit{Arch} field the \texttt{Alt} key, thus requiring alternative key combinations to be needed.  Below are some of these alternatives.
1245
1246 \vspace{2ex}
1247 \begin{tabular}{lp{11cm}}
1248     \hline                      
1249     LMB & move/create an end point (to move the end point the pointer must be above the point) \\
1250     Shift+LMB & move an end point (the pointer may be near the point, not above it) \\
1251     Ctrl+LMB & move/create a control point \\
1252     Alt+Ctrl+LMB & to drag translate the mask \\
1253     Shift+Key Delete & to delete the mask \\
1254     Shift+MMB & Set Pivot Point at pointer \\
1255     Alt+Wheel & zoom in/out the screen (also available in Ubuntu16 but does not exist in all distros) \\
1256     \hline  
1257 \end{tabular}
1258
1259 \vspace{2ex}
1260 Focus checkbox = unchecked:
1261
1262 \vspace{2ex}
1263 \begin{tabular}{ll}
1264     \hline                      
1265     Wheel & rotate around Pivot Point \\
1266     Shift+Wheel & scale around Pivot Point \\
1267     Ctrl+Wheel & rotate around pointer \\
1268     Ctrl+Shift+Wheel & scale around pointer \\
1269     
1270     \hline  
1271 \end{tabular}
1272
1273 \vspace{2ex}
1274 Focus checkbox = checked:
1275
1276 \vspace{2ex}
1277 \begin{tabular}{ll}
1278     \hline                      
1279     Wheel & rotate around Pivot Point (“Custom focus point”) \\
1280     Shift+Wheel & scale around Pivot Point (“Custom focus point”) \\       
1281     \hline  
1282 \end{tabular}
1283
1284 \vspace{2ex}
1285
1286 \subsection{Cropping}%
1287 \label{sub:cropping}
1288 \index{crop}
1289
1290 Cropping is used to reduce the visible picture area by changing the output dimensions, width and
1291 height in pixels, and the $X, Y$ values. An example of cropping and the crop menu is seen in
1292 figure~\ref{fig:cropped_area}.
1293 The easiest way to use cropping is to click with the LMB 
1294 at the spot to begin cropping and while holding down the LMB, drag the mouse. This creates a rectangular
1295 cropping area.  To change the size/location of that area, click on any of the 4 corner points
1296 with the LMB and drag.  While dragging, you will see 
1297 the X1, Y1 coordinates and W for width, H for height, in the Crop tool popup menu
1298 automatically change numerical value to reflect the current position. For precise locations, you
1299 can keyin exact values into those textboxes instead of using the mouse.
1300 Once you have the crop area defined as you want it, then click on the \textit{Apply} button to have
1301 the actual cropping take affect.
1302
1303 There are 3 choices of crop methods to choose in the menu pulldown on the bottom right side.
1304 \begin{enumerate}
1305      \item Reformat - Reformat Session crops and changes the Format for the entire session. 
1306 Because the Format is changed, this is applied to all tracks in the project. 
1307 The part of the image outside the rectangle will be cut off and the projector will make the video fit.
1308 The  \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Format} window will show the new project Width and Height values and
1309 the projector tool window will show the new $X, Y$ values. Track size remains unchanged.
1310 You can undo the cropping by entering the original project dimensions in the
1311 \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Format} window for the Width and Height.  You will also have to use the Projector
1312 tool in the Compositor toolbar to \textit{Ajdust projector automation} by clicking on the Reset icon.
1313      \item Resize - Resize Projector; to undo this, enable \textit{Adjust projector automation} 
1314 and do a Reset.
1315      \item Shrink - Resize Projector and Camera; to undo this, enable each of the \textit{Adjust
1316 projector and camera automation} tools, one at a time, and do a Reset in the menus.
1317 \end{enumerate}
1318 An important note here is that the original aspect ratio will be maintained so if your frame is
1319 rectangular (as many are) and you "crop" by surrounding the region of interest with a square,
1320 the cropped area will be more than you marked in order to keep the aspect rectangular shape.
1321 The Resize and Shrink options are applicable to all video tracks except the disarmed ones. 
1322 This is in contrast to the Reformat option, as mentioned previously, which applies to all tracks even if disarmed because it changes the Format for the session.
1323 One last note of interest, this cropping is keyframable.
1324
1325 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1326     \centering
1327     \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{cropped_area.png}
1328     \caption{Crop menu and outlined crop rectangle on the right side}
1329     \label{fig:cropped_area}
1330 \end{figure}
1331
1332 An easy to follow step by step usage of the cropping tool is outlined next.
1333 \begin{itemize}
1334     \item Enable the crop tool in the compositor window to display the Crop popup menu.
1335     \item Click-drag in the video to define the crop area which draws a rectangle on the video.
1336     \item Click-drag in the video to start a different rectangle instead.
1337     \item Click-drag on a corner of the rectangle to reposition that corner.
1338     \item Alt-click in crop rectangle to translate the rectangle to a different position without resizing.
1339     \item The crop popup menu allows text entry of the top left coordinates ($X1,Y1$) and width and
1340 height ($W, H$) that define the crop rectangle. 
1341     \item Choose one of the 3 options of Reformat, Resize, or Shrink.
1342     \item When you have the rectangle where you want it,
1343 click on the \emph{Apply} button in the menu to actually perform the crop operation.
1344 \end{itemize}
1345  
1346
1347 \section{Viewer Window}%
1348 \label{sec:viewer_window}
1349 \index{viewer!window}
1350
1351 The Viewer window (figure~\ref{fig:viewer_window}) is convenient for previewing your media and 
1352 clips. It can also be used for editing with cuts and then paste operations into the timeline or
1353 to create a clip.  There are transport buttons \index{transport buttons} to use in the same manner as in the Program
1354 and Compositor windows or you can quickly move through the media by dragging with the LMB in
1355 the timebar above the transport buttons.  
1356
1357 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1358     \centering
1359     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{viewer_window.png}
1360     \caption{Viewer Window - the red arrow "Play" button is left of the Videoscope button}
1361     \label{fig:viewer_window}
1362 \end{figure}
1363
1364 In order to view media in the window, you have to load it as follows:
1365
1366 \begin{enumerate}
1367     \item  In the Resources window, highlight the Media folder or the Clip folder.
1368     \item  Drag a file from the folder to the Viewer.
1369     \item  \textbf{Or} double LMB click on a media asset.
1370     \item  \textbf{Or} highlight an asset, RMB to bring up choices, and click on \textit{View} or
1371 \textit{View in new window}.
1372 \end{enumerate}
1373
1374 Note that you can have multiple Viewer windows open with different or even the same media asset.
1375 After the media is loaded you can use the transport buttons to play, rewind, stop, and so on, or
1376 for fast previewing drag with the LMB anywhere on the timebar slider.  There is also the Videoscope \index{videoscope}
1377 button which is to used to enable the scopes window without having to apply the filter to the tracks/edits.
1378 A few more options available in the Viewer window can be accessed with a RMB click on the display \index{viewer!RMB options}.
1379 These functions are listed next.
1380
1381 \begin{enumerate}
1382     \item  Switch to a fullscreen display by choosing \textit{Fullscreen}.  To switch back, click
1383 with the RMB on the display again and choose \textit{Windowed}.
1384     \item  Change the display size by choosing the \textit{Zoom} function to select a zoom level of
1385 25\%, 33\%, \ldots 300\%, or 400\% of the original media size.
1386     \item  To remove the current media from being displayed, choose \textit{Close source}.
1387 \end{enumerate}
1388
1389 The Viewer uses the project's output size output size{entry} format settings to display the media instead of the
1390 original asset's format. Operations performed in the Viewer affect a temporary EDL or a clip rather
1391 than the timeline.  By default, the Viewer window is automatically available but if it gets
1392 accidentally closed you can open it again by using the pulldown \texttt{Window $\rightarrow$ Show
1393 Viewer} to bring it back up.  More details for editing in the Viewer window with the Two Screen
1394 Editing method is explained in~\ref{sec:two_screen_editing}.
1395
1396
1397 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1398     \centering
1399     \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{viewer_audio.png}
1400     \caption{Viewer window at the top displaying same 5 seconds as seen in the Resources window thumbnail. At the bottom of the screen is the audio loaded on the timeline.}
1401     \label{fig:vieweraudio}
1402 \end{figure}
1403
1404 You can also use the Viewer to listen to media that consists only of Audio.  This is a quick way
1405 to listen to the audio to see if it is what you would like to add to a timeline audio track for
1406 your project.  To do this, you simply drag the audio file from the Resources window in the same
1407 manner as a video file. The viewer was designed to "view" images rather than play audio so in order
1408 to make it obvious that audio media is loaded to the viewer, a waveform \index{waveform} is displayed that is the
1409 same waveform as shown in the Resources window thumbnail when in the \textit{Display Icons} mode.
1410 This waveform only represents the first 5 seconds of the media and will not change or move while
1411 playing in the Viewer window.  But you can play the entire piece of media in the window
1412 and as you do so, you see the play cursor line move along and the timestamp reflect the actual
1413 position. You can also create clips. The entire waveform can only be seen on an actual audio track
1414 on the timeline. An example of what this looks like is shown in figure~\ref{fig:vieweraudio}.
1415
1416 \section{Options in both the Compositor and Viewer Windows}%
1417 \label{sec:options_in_both_the_compositor_and_viewer_windows}
1418
1419 The next sections describe capabilities that are available in both the Compositor and Viewer windows.
1420
1421 \subsection{Click to Play in Viewer and Compositor}%
1422 \label{sub:click_to_play_in_viewer_and_compositor}
1423
1424 In both the Viewer and Compositor windows, there is an arrow on the right hand side of the other
1425 buttons in the edit panel as shown in figure~\ref{fig:viewer_window}.  The "play" button can be
1426 toggled on/off via this arrow, which has a tooltip of \textit{Click to play} \index{click to play}.  When enabled
1427 the arrow is white surrounded by green and when disabled the arrow is red.\protect\footnote{the color and the look will be different for themes other than the default theme of Cakewalk}
1428 The purpose of enabling this capability is to make it really easy to play the media in the window
1429 by just using the left mouse button to start or stop the play.  The entire main canvas surface
1430 becomes a big play button!  Although the default is initially off, a good reason to enable this,
1431 at least temporarily, is so that you can quickly review your video before a render.
1432  
1433 \begin{description}
1434     \item[left click]  forward play or stop forward play if already playing
1435     \item[middle wheel]  single frame forward or back
1436     \item[middle click]  reverse play or stop reverse play if already playing. 
1437         Note that some 3 button mice do not accommodate a middle click for reverse but you can find out by testing from a terminal window with the command \texttt{xev}.
1438 \end{description}
1439
1440 \subsection{Timebar + Preview Region Usage in the Compositor and Viewer}%
1441 \label{sub:timebar_preview_region_usage_in_the_compositor_and_viewer}
1442 \index{preview region}
1443
1444 The Viewer and Compositor each have a timebar \index{timebar} control area with a red indicator
1445 line below the video output. The timebar shows the whole time covered by the
1446 resource. When a video resource is loaded in the main window and you move in the
1447 compositor, the insertion pointer in the main window will reflect those movements.
1448 But in the viewer only that specific media is shown and there is no corresponding movement on the timeline.
1449
1450 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1451         \centering
1452         \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{timebar1.png}
1453         \caption{The mouse cursor, above the green colored “play forward” transport button, is on the timebar. Further to the right we see the red "indicator line".}
1454         \label{fig:timebar1}
1455 \end{figure}
1456
1457 Both the Compositor and Viewer support labels and in/out pointer which are dis-
1458 played in the timebar. And as with the movements, when you use the labels or
1459 in/out pointer in the compositor timebar, the result will also be reflected in the
1460 main window timebar. Along with that, of course, when you move to a label or
1461 in/out pointer in the compositor, the insertion point in the program window will
1462 go to that position.
1463
1464 The timebar in the compositor and the viewer covers the whole length of the resource
1465 loaded in there. Moving the mouse with the LMB pressed moves the position in the resources as indicated by the indicator line. A complete mouse movement between left and right edges of the window moves the indicator line by default along the whole timebar. With long resources it can be difficult to precisely locate sections in the resource. To make this easier, you can limit the effect of the same window-wide mouse movement to a smaller area of the timebar, this area is defined as the preview region. This region can also be moved along the timebar.
1466
1467 For instance, if you need to get a few 10 second clips from an 60 minute video, you could define a one-minute preview region, move it approximately to a place where a clip needs to be taken, and easily select with the mouse in and out points within the region, because the whole window mouse movement now covers 1 minute instead of 60 minutes.
1468
1469 To create and use a preview region, hold down the right mouse button inside the timebar on either end of the timebar close to the edge until you see the resize pointer.  
1470 While continuously holding the right mouse button down, drag the arrow away from the end towards the middle of the timebar until you have the desired area outlined.  
1471 The slider will be a dark red color while the selected preview region will remain the same initial black color.  
1472 There are either a left or right resize pointer and you can click and drag in either direction to expand or shrink the region.
1473
1474 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1475     \centering
1476     \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{timebar2.png}
1477     \caption{A left-facing arrow on the right side of the reddish slider bar is used to drag the bar.}
1478     \label{fig:timebar2}
1479 \end{figure}
1480
1481 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1482     \centering
1483     \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{timebar3.png}
1484     \caption{Here you can see the right-facing arrow used to drag the other end of the slider bar. The black area is the actual preview area.}
1485     \label{fig:timebar3}
1486 \end{figure}
1487
1488 You can slide the preview zone left or right by holding the right mouse button over the preview zone where you will see a fat double headed arrow.  
1489 The selected area will move left or right as you drag and still retains the same size.
1490
1491 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1492         \centering
1493         \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{timebar4.png}
1494         \caption{Note the double-headed fat arrow in the black preview area used to move the selection over.}
1495         \label{fig:timebar4}
1496 \end{figure}
1497
1498 Settings:
1499
1500 \begin{enumerate}
1501     \item  If no preview region is set, increasing the length of the media on the timeline by inserting media or appending, has no effect on the non-selected preview region.  That is, you will not see the reddish slider bar suddenly mysteriously appear.
1502     \item  If the preview region is set, when you replace the current project or file,  the preview region is automatically disabled.
1503     \item  If the preview region is set, when you append data or change the size of the current project, the preview region may appear to either move, shrink, or grow depending on the new length of the media on the timeline.  
1504     \item  To disable the preview region, you will have to drag both the right and the left blue slider bars completely to their corresponding end so that there is no longer any visible red slider.
1505 \end{enumerate}
1506
1507 A good method for taking advantage of the preview region is described here.  
1508 On the main track canvas, scroll to the beginning of the area of interest.  
1509 When you do that, you will see in the compositor the red indicator line of that location.  
1510 Now in the compositor window, right mouse drag from the left side of the edge of the timebar to create the dark red slider bar line up to the red indicator.  
1511 Back in the main track canvas, move to the location of the area you want to end looking and again you will see the red indicator line in the compositor.  
1512 Use the right mouse drag from the right to stop at that end point.  Using this method is often easier than continuous usage of the single frame move which can be tedious.
1513
1514 One last interesting item of note -- sometimes you may wish to see just a little more that is outside the preview region and you can do so!  You can actually move outside the compositor or viewer window space and view more, at least until you hit the end of the screen space.
1515
1516 \section{Resources Window}%
1517 \label{sec:resources_window}
1518 \index{resources window}
1519
1520 Effects, transitions, labels, clips, proxies, user bins, and media assets are accessed here. 
1521 Most of the resources are inserted into the project by dragging them out of the resource window. 
1522 Management of resource allocation is also performed here.
1523
1524 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1525     \centering
1526     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{resource_window.png}
1527     \caption{Folders are in the first column with contents of that folder on the right hand side}
1528     \label{fig:resource_window}
1529 \end{figure}
1530
1531 The resources window is divided into two areas (figure~\ref{fig:resource_window}. 
1532 One area lists folders \index{folders} and another area lists the folder contents \index{folder contents}. 
1533 Going into the folder list and clicking on a folder updates the contents area with the contents of that folder. 
1534 The folders can be displayed as icons or text. 
1535 There are several variations for displaying the contents; select \emph{Display text}, \emph{Display icons}, \emph{Display icons packed}, \emph{Display icons list} as types of display for the assets or plugins. 
1536 Use the letter “\texttt{V}” to easily scroll through the choices and see which you prefer.  
1537 You can also get to these options from the menu by a right mouse click in the window.
1538
1539 A \emph{Search} \index{search resources} option is available for any of the folders in the Resources window (and when using \textit{Attach effect} on the main track canvas for the Plugins).  
1540 As you type in characters a match is made with that substring.  
1541 Names that do not match are filtered out making it a lot easier to find the item you are looking for.  
1542 The characters can be any where within the phrase and it does not matter if upper or lower case. 
1543
1544 Other options you will see if you \textit{right mouse click in the folder} which brings up the menu are described next \index{folders!RMB options}.  
1545
1546 \begin{description}
1547     \item[ Load files ]  for convenience to load files same as from the main window so you do not have to move the mouse so far in case you have multiple monitors.
1548     \item[Display text/icons]  as described previously for format variations preference.
1549     \item[Select]  options are All, Used, Unused, and None.  This gives you the capability to have a set of the
1550         contents highlighted for ease of use so you can see what is or is not loaded, or unset the highlight.
1551     \item[Sort items]  to sort the contents of the folder alphabetically.  Especially helpful if you accidentally did a 
1552         drag and changed your mind or dropped suddenly so that the assets no longer look nicely aligned.
1553     \item[Copy/Paste file list]  use to easily copy a set of files or paste a set of files between \CGG{} and other programs or operating system windows.
1554     \item[Snapshot/Grabshot]  use to take a quick snapshot or to grab a specific area on the screen.  These functions are described in detail in section \ref{sub:snapshot_grabshot}).
1555 \end{description}
1556
1557 Using the right mouse click to bring up a menu in the folder area \index{folders!RMB options}, you can also switch from Display text to Display icons, Sort items and create, delete and manipulate user defined folders/bins. Select Folder to create a user Folder or modify an existing folder.
1558
1559 If you \textit{right mouse click on a highlighted/selected resource}, several options are available depending on whether the resource is an effect or transition or a piece of media.  
1560 You can highlight several for some options so that it is applicable to all of them, such as Info.  
1561 Those listed immediately below are the available choices for media assets \index{asset!RMB options}.
1562
1563
1564 \begin{description}
1565     \item[Info] provided basic Asset information; details are described later in this section.
1566     \item[Display text/icons]  same as mentioned previously.
1567     \item[Sort]  same as mentioned previously.
1568     \item[Rebuild index] \index{rebuild index} if you switch from/to using ffmpeg/native for media loading, you should rebuild
1569         indexes.  Or if you get hangs on media or strange looking tracks, you might want to rebuild indexes.
1570     \item[View]  use this option to bring up the media in the Viewer window.
1571     \item[View in new window]  in order to not overwrite your current viewer window, you can open any
1572         number of viewer windows to simultaneously view multiple media.
1573     \item[Open mixers]  when you record with multiple cameras setup, you can work with them most easily
1574         using the mixer mode.  This is described in detail
1575     \item[Paste]  
1576     \item[Match] \index{match format} if you need to change your media parameters you can choose from the following: Match frame
1577         rate, Match project size, Match all 
1578     \item[Remove] \index{remove asset} use to Remove the asset from the project or with caution, to Remove from disk permanently.
1579 \end{description}
1580
1581 In the case of Effects or Transitions \index{effects/transitions info}, a right mouse click on a highlighted selection leads to an \emph{Info} button which gives a short 1 line description of what the effect/transition can be used for.
1582 For Labels \index{label!RMB options}, choices are \emph{Edit}, \emph{Label}, and \emph{Go to}.
1583 For Clips \index{clip!RMB options}, \emph{Nest} and \emph{UnNest} as described elsewhere are available.
1584
1585 \subsection{Info Asset Details}%
1586 \label{sub:info_asset_details}
1587 \index{asset!info}
1588 The asset \emph{Info} window also can be used to display detailed information about the selected/highlighted media file -- available for any loaded media of type mpeg or ffmpeg.  
1589 This is extremely helpful in determining what type of media it is, size, resolution, format, and type/number of audio streams.  It is especially useful for multiple program streams.  You can have the info window popped on several of your assets simultaneously.
1590
1591 \textit{Detail} opens an additional window with more information.
1592
1593 \textit{Sample rate} and \textit{Frame rate} allows you to impose a different sampling or Fps of the audio and video assets.
1594
1595 Another option is \textit{Resize} button, which allows you to change the size (in pixels) of the frame of the asset.
1596
1597 \textit{Asset's interlacing}  is the type of interlacing the asset has: If the file is (H)DV type, recognition and configuration is done automatically. All other media types will be set unknown. So we have to manually set the interlacing \protect\footnote{From Igor ubuntu's mail}.
1598
1599 Figure~\ref{fig:info_asset_details} shows the \textit{Detail} box to click on the left side and a simple, typical output in the Asset Detail window on the right side.  Also, note the highlighted media in the Resources window.
1600
1601 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1602     \centering
1603     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{info_asset_details.png}
1604     \caption{Info windows with the “Detail” box}
1605     \label{fig:info_asset_details}
1606 \end{figure}
1607
1608 \subsection{User Folders/Bins}%
1609 \label{sub:user_folders_bins}
1610 \index{user folders/bins}
1611 \index{user media bin}
1612 \index{user clip bin}
1613 \index{folder modify}
1614 \index{folder add filter/search}
1615
1616 Creating folders that are more specific to a particular project is helpful in better organizing your work.  
1617 This can be done by utilizing the files already loaded to the \textit{master} Media or Clips folders in the Resources window.  The general rule is you can only drag clips to a ClipUserBin and you can only drag media to a MediaUserBin.
1618
1619 Below are steps illustrating an easy way to set up a folder.
1620
1621 %TODO Below part need to be rewriten
1622 \begin{enumerate}
1623     \item In the Resources window (figure~\ref{fig:folder_resources}), in the location of the Video/Audio effects and Media folders, bring up the \textit{Folder}$\dots$ popup by clicking the right mouse button.  
1624         Highlight, then click \textit{New Media or Clips}.
1625         \begin{figure}[htpb]
1626             \begin{minipage}{.6\linewidth}
1627                 \centering
1628                 \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{folder_resources.png}
1629                 \caption{Highlight, then click “New Media or Clips”.
1630                     “Modify folder” can be used to change the name of a folder.
1631                     “Delete folder” in the popup can be used to delete a folder.
1632                 }
1633                 \label{fig:folder_resources}
1634             \end{minipage}
1635             \hfill
1636             \begin{minipage}{.37\linewidth}
1637                 \centering
1638 %begin{latexonly}
1639                 \vspace{18ex}
1640 %end{latexonly}
1641
1642                 \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{folder_new.png}
1643                 \caption{Type in your folder name in the textbox.  Click OK.}
1644                 \label{fig:folder_new}
1645             \end{minipage}
1646         \end{figure}
1647     \item  In the \textit{New folder} popup as shown below (figure~\ref{fig:folder_new}), type in your folder name in the textbox.  Click OK.
1648      \begin{figure}[htbp]    
1649         \centering
1650         \includegraphics[width=0.9\linewidth]{folder_master.png}
1651         \caption{The “master” Media folder}
1652         \label{fig:folder_master}
1653      \end{figure}     
1654     \item  Select the \textit{master} Media folder to see which files are currently loaded, figure~\ref{fig:folder_master}.  
1655         Highlight the files there that you want to copy to your new folder (named Photos of Garden).  
1656         Drag the files to the left and when you see the Photos of Garden folder become highlighted, then drop there.  
1657         You can drag and drop any of the media from the \textit{master} Media at any time.  
1658         It flashes when the drop is successful.
1659 \end{enumerate}
1660
1661 Adding the Shift key before the actual drop, will allow for relative path filenames instead of full path.
1662 But you might want to include or eliminate some of the media that exists in one of the folders that you have set up already.  
1663 In this case you will want to click on the \textit{Modify folder} in the popup.  
1664 When you bring up the Modify folder window, if you already have files in that folder, you will see filters that were generated automatically when you did a Drag and Drop.
1665
1666
1667 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1668     \centering
1669     %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{name.ext}
1670     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
1671         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{folder_modify.png}};
1672         \node [yshift=-20mm, xshift=-1cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Arrow1) {\parbox{8em}{Here is the filter that was generated with the original drop }};
1673         \node [yshift=-65mm, xshift=0cm,anchor=east] at (img1.north west) (Arrow2) {\parbox{10em}{When you click on the Value portion of that filter, the entire set of files that are covered by the filter rules pops up.   Now you can highlight a target filename that you would like to remove, and just erase that line and check the green checkmark for OK.}};
1674         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Arrow1) edge  ([yshift=-20mm] img1.north west);
1675         \end{tikzpicture}
1676     
1677     \caption{Modify target}
1678     \label{fig:modify-target}
1679 \end{figure}
1680
1681 To delete the entire set of files listed on the filter rule, highlight the rule line and hit the \textit{Del} button.  
1682 To add a new filter rule, click on the \textit{Add} button which will automatically add a default line after any current lines.  
1683 The default line will be a line that matches everything in the \textit{master} Media folder which is \textit{Or  Patterns  Matches   *}.  
1684 Click the right mouse button on the current field underneath the column header to see the choices available for each column.  
1685
1686 Modifications will not be in effect until you click on the green arrow OK button or click on the Apply button.  
1687 But once you hit Apply, clicking on the red X button will not undo your changes.  
1688 The filter/search rules are applied in the order listed in the Modify folder window.  
1689 You can change the order of the filter rules by highlighting the rule you want to move and then drag and drop to a new location.
1690
1691 The figure~\ref{fig:modify_folder} below displays the available choices for each field.
1692
1693 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1694     \centering
1695     %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{name.ext}
1696     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
1697         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{modify_folder1.png}};
1698         \node (img2) [yshift=-1cm, xshift=3.5cm, rotate=0] at (img1) {\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{modify_folder2.png}};
1699         \node (img3) [yshift=-1cm, xshift=3cm, rotate=0] at (img2){\includegraphics[width=0.5\linewidth]{modify_folder3.png}};
1700     \end{tikzpicture}
1701     \caption{The available choices for each field}
1702     \label{fig:modify_folder}
1703 \end{figure}
1704
1705 Information about the columns and rules for the search filters in the Modify folder window follows \index{folder add filter/search}.
1706
1707 Column headers:
1708
1709 \begin{description}
1710 \item[ Enable]  this column is used to designate the state of that filter rule
1711     \begin{description}
1712         \item[ Off]             disable the filter
1713                 \item[And]              narrow your search; all of your search terms must be present
1714                 \item[Or]               broaden your search to include more values
1715                 \item[And Not]  exclude terms that do not contain the given value from your search results
1716                 \item[Or Not]   include terms that do not contain the given value from your search results
1717     \end{description}
1718 \item [Target] – this column designates which media asset attribute to look at
1719     \begin{description}
1720         \item[ Patterns]        each line contains a filename filter, matches the file path
1721                 \item[Filesize] number of bytes in a file
1722                 \item[Time]             date file was created
1723                 \item[Track Type]       track type of video, audio, or audio video (for both)
1724                 \item[Width]    Format width
1725                 \item[Height]   Format height
1726                 \item[Framerate]        Video framerate
1727                 \item[Samplerate]       Audio samplerate
1728                 \item[Channels] Number of audio channels
1729                 \item[Duration] Playback time in seconds -- it uses the largest of audio or video if contains both
1730     \end{description}
1731 \item[Op] – boolean operators used to narrow or broaden the relationship between your search terms
1732     \begin{description}
1733         \item[Around]   about this value; use \textit{+radius} for a search range: [target–radius$\dots$  target+radius]
1734         \item[Eq        ]       equal to
1735         \item[Ge]       greater than or equal to
1736         \item[Gt]       greater than
1737         \item[Ne]not equal
1738         \item[Le]       less than or equal
1739         \item[Lt] less than
1740         \item[Matches]  exactly matches for strings
1741     \end{description}
1742 \end{description}
1743
1744 \textbf{Value} --- the characteristic you are looking for with expressions that can be written with the following:
1745
1746 \begin{description}
1747 \item[Number] (decimal points are allowed and will be converted to a standard form):
1748     \begin{description}
1749         \item[inf] representing infinity
1750         \item[\#[TtGgMmKk]]  ---  where \# represents a number and the characters mean:
1751     \end{description}
1752
1753     \begin{tabular}{rcl}
1754         inf&=& infinity\\
1755         T&=&1099511627776\\
1756         t&=&1000000000000\\
1757         G&=&1073741824\\
1758         g&=&1000000000\\
1759         M&=&1048576\\
1760         m&=&1000000\\
1761         K&=&1024\\
1762         k&=&1000\\
1763     \end{tabular}
1764
1765 \item[Scalar:] 
1766
1767     \begin{tabular}{l}
1768         Number\\
1769         Number+Number\\
1770     \end{tabular}
1771 \item[Date time:]
1772     \begin{tabular}{rcl}
1773         date&=&year/month\\
1774         date&=&year/month/day\\
1775         time&=&hour:minute\\
1776         time&=&hour:minute:second\\
1777         date\_time&=&date time\\
1778     \end{tabular}
1779
1780   \item[Duration:]
1781       \begin{tabular}{rcl}
1782     day  &=&    \#day     | \#days\\
1783     week &=&    \#week    | \#weeks\\
1784     month&=&    \#month | \#months\\
1785     year &=&    \#year    | \#years\\
1786     delta&=&secs\\
1787     delta&=&mins:secs\\
1788     delta&=&hours:mins:secs\\
1789       \end{tabular}
1790
1791 \item[Around time:]
1792     date time+duration
1793
1794   \item[Around length:]
1795     duration+duration
1796
1797 \end{description}
1798
1799 Table showing the allowed usage:
1800
1801 %TODO create table for below code
1802 \begin{lstlisting}[numbers=none]
1803 target:    |  eq  ge  gt  ne  le  lt   matches  around
1804 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
1805 patterns   | <---- strcmp ---------> + filter + nearest
1806 file_size  | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1807 mod_time   | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1808 track_type | <---- member test ------+--------+------>
1809 width      | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1810 height     | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1811 framerate  | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1812 samplerate | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1813 channels   | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1814 duration   | <---- arithmetic -------+------> + radius
1815 \end{lstlisting}
1816
1817 where in the above, the filter can be:
1818
1819 \begin{tabular}{rcl}
1820     filter&=&list\\
1821     filter&=&token\\
1822     list&=&[token]\\
1823     list&=&[token]list\\
1824     string&=&<chars>|<empty>\\
1825     token&=&string\\
1826     token&=&string*token\\
1827 \end{tabular}
1828
1829 Examples with some caveats first:
1830
1831 \begin{enumerate}
1832     \item   \textit{Or} generally includes or adds whereas \textit{And} generally excludes or subtracts.
1833     \item   The filters only work on media in the folder; if there is no media, then there is nothing to search.
1834     \item   The examples below are not meant to be executed as a list of filters in Modify folder, they are just single line examples to indicate what can work.
1835     \item   Sort is by filename base name (directory path not included automatically) except when the \textit{Around} operation is used and then it is sorted by that Target distance first and then filename.
1836 \end{enumerate}
1837
1838 \begin{table}[htpb]
1839     \centering
1840     \caption{Examples}
1841     \label{tab:label}
1842     \small
1843     \begin{tabular}{lllm{10em}m{10em}} \toprule
1844         Enable& Target& Op&     Value&  meaning\\\midrule
1845 Or      &Patterns  &Matches   &*&        all files from the Media folder are included\\
1846 And Not&Filesize&Lt     &160000000& no files that are less than 160MB in size \\
1847 Or Not& Time    &Ge     &2018/07/30 06:13:00    & files not greater than or equal date\\
1848 And     &Duration&Eq    &01:00          & files included must have 60 secs. Duration\\
1849 Off     &Samplerate&Ne  &44000          & off for now, but may want to include later\\
1850 And     &Framerate&Around&24+1          & files included all have 24 to 25 framerate\\
1851 Or      &Patterns&Matches&[*.mp4]       & all files with the extension of mp4\\
1852 Or      &Time&  Around&2018/08/02 06:00:00 + 02:00:00  & files at 4AM to 8 AM\\\bottomrule
1853     \end{tabular}
1854 \end{table}
1855
1856
1857 \subsection{Vicons \& Aicons – aka Video Icons / Audio Icons}%
1858 \label{sub:vicons_aicons_aka_video_icons_audio_icons}
1859 \index{vicon!video icons}
1860 \index{aicon!audio icons}
1861
1862 Vicons are video icons.  
1863 Aicons are audio icons.  
1864 By default the Resources window will play the first 5 seconds of video or audio waveform looped in the area occupied by the media icons (figure~\ref{fig:vicons1}). 
1865 This is enabled for the Media/Proxy folders in icon mode when the mouse pointer is inside the Resources window. 
1866
1867 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1868     \centering
1869     \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{vicons1.png}
1870     \caption{Note "Full Play" mode and Vicons and Aicons in Media folder}
1871     \label{fig:vicons1}
1872 \end{figure}
1873
1874 The waveform \index{waveform} in the figure~\ref{fig:vicons2} is displayed in the Resources window in the color green for the 3 audio tracks. 
1875 There is a colored bar \index{color bar aicons} on the top of each a-icon where the color is based on the Color Spectrum -- the smaller the time duration, the redder the color; then as the time duration goes up, the color goes up so that you will go to green, then yellow, then blue, then really dark blue, then purple for the audio files 1 hour and over.  
1876 There are various other colors between these colors same as that seen in the color spectrum in the screenshot below.  
1877 Colors are utilized from the hue wheel in the counter-clockwise direction.  
1878 Note that the horizontal line in the middle of the a-icon is yellow/red representing the 2 audio tracks and is only red for mono.
1879
1880
1881
1882 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1883     \centering
1884     %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{name.ext}
1885     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
1886         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{vicons2.png}};
1887         \node (img2) [yshift=0cm, xshift=2.8cm, rotate=0] at (img1.south west) {\includegraphics[width=0.3\linewidth]{hue_wheel.png}};
1888         \node [yshift=-5mm, xshift=1cm,anchor=west] at (img2.east) (Arrow1) {\parbox{18em}{Color hue wheel. For illustration only}};
1889         \draw [->, line width=1mm] (Arrow1) edge  ([yshift=-5mm] img2.east);
1890     \end{tikzpicture}
1891     \caption{Draw Vicons   |            Screenshot display various audio file lengths; red is shortest.}
1892     \label{fig:vicons2}
1893 \end{figure}
1894
1895 Note that if in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences} under the Appearance tab, you have unchecked \textit{Use thumbnails in resource window} you will only have default icons and none of the above capabilities.
1896
1897
1898 \subsection{Resources Window Preview Mode}%
1899 \label{sub:resources_window_preview_mode}
1900 \index{resources preview}
1901
1902
1903 Preview mode can be used to pop up a window which draws the vicons/aicons thumbnails in a larger size.  
1904 Preview or \textit{draw vicons} mode is a helpful feature of \CGG{} that lets you see and/or hear the first 5 seconds of the video for identification purposes. 
1905 The Preview mode/playback toggle is to the right of the Visibility label as seen in the screenshot above. 
1906 Preview mode is available for the Media, Proxy, Media User Bins, and Clips but clips are only 1 image.
1907
1908 When \textit{Preview/draw vicons} is enabled/active, if you click on one of the video icons or an audio waveform icon, a view pops up that increases the size to 4 times the surface area larger. 
1909 This makes it easier to see or hear if it is the media you are looking for in case you have many similar media files. 
1910 To conserve memory, the video is stored 8\,bits per pixel which results in low image quality while the audio is 16\,bit. 
1911 The reason for playing 5 seconds of a video for a vicon is that until the first I-frame, the media frequently does not decode properly.  
1912 In other words, a lot of media does not begin at the \textit{beginning} point and will not be properly rendered until enough data has been read to assemble a picture.  
1913 You can increase the thumbnail size, clarity of pixels (memory size) and color mode but it takes a lot more memory.  
1914 Change these values in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences}, Appearance tab, right hand side of the Layout section -- be aware that when you click OK, your session will re-initialize.  
1915 You can also temporarily increase the preview mini-window by use of the mouse wheel up or down.
1916
1917 There are 4 options for the preview mode.
1918
1919 \begin{enumerate}
1920     \item  \emph{Full Play} \index{full play} is the default mode.  
1921         This means all of the media will automatically play when the mouse is in the Resources window and you can use the left mouse button to click on specific media to see it pop up in a larger view.  
1922         Audio only files do not play the audio until the icon is clicked on and the waveform aicon pops up into the 4x larger mode. 
1923         \emph{Full Play} includes the \emph{Mouse Over} capabilities as described below as well as the Inter-View \emph{Src Target} functions.
1924
1925         \item  \emph{No Play} \index{no play} mode is especially useful on smaller computers and for users who find the constant loop play to be somewhat distracting.
1926
1927         \item  \emph{Mouse Over} \index{mouse over} mode is activated by a single click on one of the vicons/aicons and deactivated with another single click over any of the icons.  
1928     Once activated, whenever you just move the mouse over an icon, it automatically pops up the increased size preview.  
1929     The first time in your session that you enable this feature, it may take a few seconds to load all of the icon previews into memory so be patient and just wait.  
1930     \emph{Mouse Over} mode makes it quick and easy to preview without having to drag the media to the viewer.  
1931     You can still drag the media same as without preview enabled.  
1932
1933         \item  \emph{Src Target} \index{source target} mode gives easy access to the Inter-View source target available by using the middle mouse button on media.  
1934     There are 2 advantages to this mode -- there is no 5 second play loop taking up cpu time and the popup allows for the use of the letter “\texttt{f}” on that popup to have it go to fullscreen mode.  
1935     \emph{Src Target} mode in any scenario never plays sound as that is nonsensical usage.  
1936     After the initial click to pop media in this mode, you also have the \emph{Mouse over} feature.
1937 \end{enumerate}
1938
1939 For any of the options, but not \emph{No Play}, you can temporarily turn off that option by clicking on the button using the middle mouse button.  
1940 This helps to avoid having the thumbnail get in the way of dragging or other functions.  
1941 When you do, a line will be drawn through the current preview mode so that you are aware that it is in \emph{No Play} mode until click it again.
1942
1943 Note that if in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences} under the Appearance tab, you have unchecked \textit{Use thumbnails in resource window} you will only have default icons and no active previews.
1944
1945 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1946     \begin{minipage}{.69\linewidth}
1947         \centering
1948         \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{preview_icon_mode.png}
1949         \caption{The location of the Preview/Draw Icons mode.}
1950         \label{fig:preview_icon_mode}
1951     \end{minipage}
1952     \hfill
1953     \begin{minipage}{.29\linewidth}
1954         \vspace{2ex}
1955         \centering
1956         \includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{line_through_mode.png}
1957         \caption{Note the line through the mode.}
1958         \label{fig:line_through_mode}
1959     \end{minipage}
1960 \end{figure}
1961
1962
1963
1964 \subsection{Moving clips/media from/to Resources window}%
1965 \label{sub:moving_clips_media_from_to_resources_window}
1966 \index{copy/paste from/to resources window}
1967
1968 If you have several media files loaded into the Resources window of one instance of \CGG{} and want to load some of the same ones into another instance or just want a listing to save in a file for later use, you can do this with these set of steps:
1969
1970 Copy or paste a list of files in the Media Resources window:  
1971
1972
1973 \begin{enumerate}
1974     \item  create a highlighted selection of the desired media files in the media Resources window
1975     \item    right click on an unused portion of that window to bring up the popup menu
1976     \item     select the \textit{Copy file list} item and a file list box will appear that contains the full path filenames
1977     \item     wipe the textbox using your standard copy/paste method to put the list of files in the copy buffer
1978     \item     in another \CGG{} instance, choose the \textit{Paste file list} of the media Resources window
1979     \item     paste the list of files, again using your standard paste method, into the new file list box; press OK
1980     \item    the status bar of the main window will be updated as the file list is loaded to the media folder (the purpose of displaying the status is simply to show that the load is progressing normally).
1981 \end{enumerate}
1982
1983 Obviously this \textit{Paste file list} feature means you can create a list of files outside of \CGG{} using an editor, wipe the names, and then use \textit{Paste file list} to load them into the media Resources window.  
1984
1985 It is important to note that in the steps above, the Operating System cut and paste capabilities are in use for steps 4 and 6 as opposed to \CGG{}’s c/v shortcuts.  
1986 Since the procedure varies among the distros, you will have to adapt to your specific one.  For example, a usage for ubuntu consists of:
1987 \begin{enumerate}
1988     \setcounter{enumi}{3}
1989     \item   Ctrl-c to copy the list of files; open gedit; Ctrl-v to paste the list of files into gedit
1990     \item   Ctrl-c or the standard way using the right click to copy this list from gedit
1991     \item Ctrl-v paste the list of files into the new file list box, and press OK
1992 \end{enumerate}
1993
1994 \begin{figure}[htpb]
1995     \centering
1996     \begin{minipage}{.9\linewidth}
1997     \centering
1998         \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{copy_files1.png}
1999     \end{minipage}
2000     \vfill
2001     \begin{minipage}{.5\linewidth}
2002     \centering
2003         \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{copy_files2.png}
2004     \end{minipage}
2005     \caption{Example of copy file list}
2006     \label{fig:copy_files1}
2007 \end{figure}
2008
2009 In the Figure~\ref{fig:copy_files1}, one instance of \CGG{} has 3 items in the Media area highlighted that were copied to the file list.  
2010 Note how it includes the full pathname.
2011
2012 In this screenshot on another instance of \CGG{}, there are only 2 items in the media but the \textit{Paste file list} box is ready to have the items inserted via the standard text box paste method.  When that is done, the additional 6 media files will be available on this other instance too.
2013
2014
2015 Another possible usage of this capability:
2016
2017 \begin{enumerate}
2018     \item  Right Click on the Clips Resources window and use the \textit{Paste Clip} option to paste the Copy selection as a clip.  
2019     \item  Similarly, by highlighting a clip in the Resources window and selecting its copy popup menu item using the right mouse button, that copy buffer can now be loaded onto the timeline.
2020 \end{enumerate}
2021
2022
2023 \subsection{Snapshot / Grabshot}%
2024 \label{sub:snapshot_grabshot}
2025 \index{snapshot}
2026 \index{grabshot}
2027
2028 \begin{figure}[htpb]
2029     \centering
2030     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
2031     \centering
2032     \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{snapshot.png}
2033     \caption{Snapshot menu and choices}
2034     \label{fig:snapshot}
2035     \end{minipage}
2036     \begin{minipage}{.49\linewidth}
2037     \centering
2038     \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1, transform shape]
2039         \node (img1) [yshift=0cm, xshift=0cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.65\linewidth]{grabshot.png}};
2040         \node (img2) [yshift=2cm, xshift=-1cm, rotate=0] {\includegraphics[width=0.07\linewidth]{reticle.png}};
2041     \end{tikzpicture}
2042     \caption{Grabshot reticle \& orange box}
2043     \label{fig:grabshot_recticle}
2044     \end{minipage}
2045 \end{figure}
2046
2047 To take a snapshot, perform the following steps:
2048
2049 \begin{enumerate}
2050     \item set your timeline insert marker where you want the snapshot -- this frame shows in the compositor
2051     \item  right click in an empty spot in the media folder and the popup shows snapshot as the $5^{th}$ item down
2052     \item  highlight that and the submenu comes up allowing you to choose png, jpg, ppm or tiff
2053 \end{enumerate}
2054
2055 The snapshot shows up in the Media folder.  
2056 It is saved by default in \texttt{/tmp} as
2057
2058 \texttt{snap\_date-time.ext} BUT you can change the default directory path in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences $\rightarrow$ Interface tab} in the right hand side of the Editing section.
2059
2060 Grabshot is the $6^{th}$ menu item.  
2061 A red circle reticle can be moved to the area to grab; use left mouse drag to surround an area; and right click to grab.
2062
2063
2064
2065
2066 \section{Other Options and Other Windows}%
2067 \label{sec:other_options_and_other_windows}
2068
2069 \subsection{Transport Controls}%
2070 \label{sub:transport_controls}
2071 \index{transport buttons}
2072
2073 Transport controls are useful for navigation and for playing media.  
2074 Each of the Viewer, Compositor, and Program windows has its own transport panel.  
2075 The controls generally all contain a yellow colored tooltip when you mouse over the control, providing a hint of their function and shortcuts for usage.
2076
2077 The transport panel is controlled by the keyboard as well as the graphical interface. 
2078 For each of the operations it performs, the starting position is the position of the insertion point in the Program window and the slider in the Compositor and Viewer windows. 
2079 The ending position is either the end or start of the timeline or the end or start of the selected region if there is one.
2080
2081 The orientation of the end or start depends on the direction of playback. 
2082 If it is forward the end position is the end of the selected region. 
2083 If it is backward the end position is the start of the selected region.  
2084 The insertion point moves to track playback. 
2085 When playback stops, the insertion point stays where playback stopped. 
2086 Thus, by playing back you change the position of the insertion point. 
2087 The keyboard interface of either the numeric pad or alternative keys has more speeds with the addition of \emph{Forward Slow}(2) and \emph{Reverse Slow} (5).  
2088 Hitting any key on the keyboard twice pauses it. 
2089 The shortcuts section of this manual as well as a Shell Command available from the \CGG{} main window has a listing of each of the keys.
2090
2091 When using frame advance functions the behavior may seem odd. 
2092 If you frame advance forward and then frame advance backward, the displayed frame does not change. 
2093 This is because the playback position is not the frame but the time between two frames. 
2094 The rendered frame is the area that the playback position crosses. 
2095 When you increment the time between two frames by one and decrement it by one, you cross the same frame both times and so the same frame is displayed.  
2096 There is an option in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences, Appearance tab} to \textit{Always show next frame} that may help make this clearer for some users.
2097
2098 The transport behavior changes if you hold down Ctrl when issuing any of the transport commands. This causes the starting point to be the In point if playing forward and the Out point if playing backward. If playing forward, the Out point becomes the ending point and if playing backward, the In point becomes the ending point. If no In/Out points are specified, the behavior falls back to using the insertion point and track boundaries as the starting and ending points.
2099
2100 The transport behavior also changes if you hold down the Shift key along with KeyPad 1--6.  
2101 If normally audio is included in the play, it will be removed and if normally audio is not included in the play, it will be added.
2102
2103
2104 \subsection{Zoombar}%
2105 \label{sub:zoombar}
2106 \index{zoom}
2107
2108 The compositor has zoom capability. 
2109 The pull-down menu on the bottom of the compositor window has a number of zoom options. 
2110 When set to Auto the video is zoomed to match the compositor window size as closely as possible. 
2111 When the video is zoomed bigger than the window size,  you can use scrollbars to scan around or if the zoom icon is enabled, the middle mouse button can be used to zoom in or out the video.
2112
2113 The zoom toggle also causes the Compositor window to enter zoom mode. 
2114 In zoom mode, clicking in the video output zooms in while a Ctrl-click in the video output zooms out. 
2115 If you have a wheel mouse, rotating the wheel zooms in or out too. 
2116 Zooming in or out with the zoom tool does not change the rendered output. 
2117 It is merely for scrutinizing video or fitting it in the desktop. Playing video on the compositor when zoomed to any size other that 100\%, the original size, requires \CGG{} to do extra processing steps. 
2118 This could affect performance on slower systems
2119
2120 \subsection{Show Overlays}%
2121 \label{sub:show_overlays}
2122 \index{show ovelays window}
2123
2124 Color Coded Keyframe Curves are a big feature in the \textit{Show Overlays} window because by changing the colors to suit the user, it helps to remove confusion from multiple curves on the track canvas.  
2125 They can be viewed from the pulldown menu of \texttt{Window $\rightarrow$ Show overlays} but they will operate the same as when used from the \textit{View} pulldown menu.  
2126 The \textit{Color Coded Keyframe Curves} have distinct colors associated with each type for ease of identification.  
2127 By clicking LMB on the \textit{Color Ball} to the right of any keyframe type in the \textit{Show overlays} menu you have the ability to change the colors to whatever works best for your video.  
2128 The color ball changes made will be retained across sessions.
2129
2130 There is a line separating the first 4 items, which are just non-automation type settable values as opposed to \textit{auto} keyframe types.  
2131 The color is not changeable for the 3 items of Mode, Pan, and Mask which simply display their symbol icon.
2132
2133 Figure~\ref{fig:overlays_window} displays the Show overlays popup with all of its options and color coded types such as yellow for Speed and blue for Camera Z.  
2134 Upon clicking on the associated \textit{color ball} to the right of any keyframe type, for example \textit{Fade} in this screenshot, the color wheel palette window pops up so that you can manipulate the color as desired.
2135
2136 \begin{figure}[htpb]
2137     \centering
2138     \includegraphics[width=0.85\linewidth]{overlays_window.png}
2139     \caption{Show Overlays window on the left with the Color ball window to the right to set color}
2140     \label{fig:overlays_window}
2141 \end{figure}
2142
2143 Figure~\ref{fig:overlays1} shows several color coded lines for different keyframes along with the Fade slider for manipulation.  
2144 The slider is in the same color as the color coded keyframe type line which is the same color as in the \textit{Show overlays} window.
2145
2146 \begin{figure}[htpb]
2147     \centering
2148     \includegraphics[width=1.0\linewidth]{overlays1.png}
2149     \caption{Lines are colored here on the timeline as designated in Show Overlays}
2150     \label{fig:overlays1}
2151 \end{figure}
2152
2153 Overlays Window Nuances:
2154
2155 The Overlays window is an alternative to the main track canvas \textit{View} pulldown, and thus the order is mostly maintained to match each other.  
2156 To make it easier to get a quick temporary look at a specific option, there is a shortcut of Shift-LMB (left mouse button) that can be used as opposed to having to uncheck everything that is currently checked and then having to recheck them on when done.  
2157 Here is a list of how they work.  Keep in mind that if the Expander on the patchbay is enabled, you still see the track.
2158
2159 \begin{itemize}
2160     \item  Shift+LMB (left mouse button) in the Overlays Window on a checkbox will turn off all other
2161         checkboxes except for the one you are on.  Then this named box will have outline for a  \textit{hot} spot.
2162     \item  Shift+LMB on this \textit{hot} spot will return to \textit{cool} of the previous settings with all of the previous
2163         checkboxes checked again.
2164 \end{itemize}
2165
2166 \begin{figure}[htpb]
2167         \begin{minipage}{.29\linewidth}
2168                 \centering
2169                 \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{overlays_list1.png}
2170                 \caption{Original Settings --- cool spot}
2171                 \label{fig:overlays_list1}
2172         \end{minipage}
2173         \hfill
2174         \begin{minipage}{.29\linewidth}
2175                 \centering
2176                 \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{overlays_list2.png}
2177                 \caption{Note Titles box hot spot  }
2178                 \label{fig:overlays_list2}
2179         \end{minipage}
2180         \hfill
2181         \begin{minipage}{.29\linewidth}
2182                 \centering
2183                 \includegraphics[width=0.99\linewidth]{overlays_list3.png}
2184                 \caption{Cam/Proj XYZ toggle to fine tune}
2185                 \label{fig:overlays_list3}
2186         \end{minipage}
2187 \end{figure}
2188
2189 \begin{itemize}
2190     \item  Shift+LMB on a non-\textit{hot} spot will simply check or uncheck a box and there is no previous state.
2191     \item This all works in conjunction with the \textit{View} pulldown menu which, of course, has no hot spots.
2192     \item  Caveat \#1 - Shift+LMB on the top 4 choices of Assets, Titles, Transitions, Plugin Keyframes will turn
2193         off all of the checkboxes below because it makes sense to do so.
2194     \item  Caveat \#2 - Shift+LMB on the Autos will not turn off Assets, Titles, Transitions, or Plugin Keyframes
2195         because you need to be able to see what is going on.
2196         \item Caveat \#3 - XYZ toggle on/off of Camera and Projector are not affected.
2197 \end{itemize}
2198
2199
2200
2201
2202 \subsection{Sound Level Meters Window}%
2203 \label{sub:sound_level_meters_window}
2204 \index{sound level meters window}
2205
2206 An additional window, the levels window, can be brought up from the \textit{Window} pulldown.  
2207 The levels window displays the output audio levels after all mixing is done.  
2208 The visible range of the sound level meters is configurable in \texttt{Settings $\rightarrow$ Preferences, Interface tab} under the Operations section.
2209
2210 \begin{wrapfigure}[18]{O}{0.3\linewidth} 
2211         \centering
2212         \vspace{-2ex}
2213         \includegraphics[width=0.5\linewidth]{volume_meter.png}
2214         \caption{Sound Level Meters Window}
2215         \label{fig:volume_meter}
2216 \end{wrapfigure}
2217
2218 Sound level meters can be toggled in the viewer and compositor windows with the show meters button.  
2219 They also appear in the patchbay when the track is expanded and in the recording monitor when audio is being recorded. 
2220
2221 The sound levels in the levels window, compositor, and viewer correspond to the final output levels before they are clipped to the sound card range.  
2222 In the record monitor they are the input values from the sound card.  
2223 In the patchbay they are the sound levels for each track after all effects are processed and before down-mixing for the output.  
2224 Most of the time, audio levels have numerical markings in dB but in the patchbay there is not enough room.
2225
2226 The sound level is color coded as an extra means of determining the sound level.  
2227 Even without numerical markings, the sound level color can distinguish between several ranges and overload.  
2228 Look at the color codings in a meter with numerical markings to see what colors correspond to what sound level.  
2229 Then for meters in the patchbay in expanded audio tracks, use the color codings to see if it is overloading.
2230
2231 Be aware that sound levels in \CGG{} can go above 0 dB.  
2232 This allows for not only seeing if a track is overloading but how much information is being lost by the overloading.  
2233 Overloading by less than 3 dB is usually acceptable.  
2234 While overloading is treated as positive numbers in \CGG{}, it is clipped to 0 when sent to a sound card or file.
2235
2236
2237 %%% Local Variables:
2238 %%% mode: latex
2239 %%% TeX-master: "../CinelerraGG_Manual"
2240 %%% End: